appliance repair in Westminster, CO

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Appliance Repair Westminster, CO

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Delivering industry-leading repair work at cost-conscious pricing is one of our top priorities. So, don't hesitate to call our office if you find yourself in a bind - even on weekends.

When you choose to have Westminster's Best Appliance Repair to visit your home in an emergency, you can count on:

  • Open Communication
  • Trustworthy Advice
  • Quick Turnaround Times
  • Honest Pricingb
  • Hard Work
  • Long-Lasting Repairs for Your Appliances

Taking this approach gives us the chance to fix your appliance quickly, so you don't have to stress about what to do next. If you have a unique or older appliance that needs fixing, don't sweat it - our experienced appliance technicians can repair just about any appliance under the sun. Whether it's refrigerator repair, washer repair, stove repair, or any other kind of appliance repair, we're here to fix the problem when you're ready.

When we say we repair just about every appliance under the sun, we mean it. Here are just a few of our most popular appliance repair specialties:

Common Signs You Need Dishwasher Repair in Westminster, COUnusual Cooking Times

Appliance Repair Westminster, CO

Clean Dishes Are Cool to Touch After Removing: For dishes to be clean and germ-free, you need hot, soapy water for washing. The FDA recommends using water around 110 degrees Fahrenheit, which is uncomfortable for handwashing but perfect for dishwashing machines. If you find that your dishes are cold and clammy instead of hot and steamy when you remove them, your dishwasher might need a new heating coil.

Appliance Repair Westminster, CO

Dishwasher Isn't Draining: You'll know quickly if your dishwasher isn't draining properly because there will be a pool of water under your machine. If you're dealing with drainage problems, it could be due to a clogged drainage system or non-functioning pump.

Appliance Repair Westminster, CO

Leaky Dishwasher: As one of our most requested appliance repairer services, we help customers deal with leaky dishwashers all the time. This common problem can be caused by a damaged door gasket, leaky dishwasher tub, loose valve, or another issue.

Common Signs You Need Refrigerator Repair in Westminster, CO

Appliance Repair Westminster, CO

Loud Humming and Vibrating Noises: Hearing vibrating and humming sounds from your fridge is not uncommon. In fact, these noises are a normal part of your refrigerator's operation. However, they shouldn't be very noisy at all. If you hear unusually loud knocking, humming, or vibrating, you could have a problem on your hands. Whether it's a faulty compressor or a blocked condenser fan, our team will diagnose the problem and get to work fixing your fridge.

Appliance Repair Westminster, CO

Spoiled Food: The whole point of putting your food in the refrigerator is so it doesn't spoil. So, if you notice your food spoiling prematurely, it's a good sign that you need appliance repair for your refrigerator. Because of the nature of these repairs, it's important to hire a licensed repair technician to find and correct the root cause of your problem.

Appliance Repair Westminster, CO

Water on Floor Underneath Fridge: If you spot standing water under your refrigerator, it's a big cause for concern. Not just for the health of your appliance, but for water leaking into your home. Usually, leaks are caused by trapped condensation due to clogged pipes or hoses. You'll need an experienced refrigerator repair tech to clear blockages and ultimately solve your leaking problem.

Common Signs You Need Oven or Stove Repair in Westminster, CO

Appliance Repair Westminster, CO

Unusual Cooking Times: Are your grandma's time-tested recipes being burnt or undercooked? Have you had to change cooking times for your family's favorite meals? Unusual differences in cooking times are a telltale sign that your oven needs to be repaired by a professional.

Appliance Repair Westminster, CO

Oven Won't CloseElectrical Problems: It might seem minor on the surface, but when your oven door doesn't close, you can't cook your food properly. Chances are you need a licensed oven repair technician to refit or replace the hinges on your oven door, so you can get back to cooking.

Appliance Repair Westminster, CO

Electrical Problems: If you have an electric oven and notice that it cuts off during cooking or won't turn on at all, you might need oven repair. Like gas, electrical problems are best remedied by professionals, like those you'll find at Westminster's Best Appliance Repair.

Your Best Choice for Expert Appliance Repair in Westminster, CO

Whatever appliance repair issue you need solving, there is no problem too big or small for our team to handle. There's a reason why we call ourselves Westminster's Best Appliance Repair: because we offer the total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Westminster, we fix all major domestic and foreign brands with unbeatable deals and 100% customer satisfaction.

Customers choose our company for their appliance repairs because we provide:

  • Service to All Major Brands
  • Over 25 Years of Appliance Repair Experience
  • 7-Day and Emergency Services
  • Best Warranty in Town: 5-Year Parts and 6 Months Labor
  • Friendly, Helpful Customer Service
  • Licensed & Insured Work
  • Free Estimates
  • Mobile Service = We Come to You!

Whether you need emergency repairs for your clothes washer or need routine appliance maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations.

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Latest News in Westminster, CO

EPR unbowed after inspector rejects its Westminster basement spa

A planning inspector has rejected an appeal against Westminster City Council’s earlier decision to refuse permission for the practice’s Leconfield House proposals in Mayfair.An EPR spokesperson said the practice was ‘proud’ of its scheme, which it said ‘looked to retain and repurpose the original fabric of the building’ in Curzon Street.They added: ‘We continue to work ... to deliver a scheme that looks to reuse the existing building while bringing about social and cultural infrastructu...

A planning inspector has rejected an appeal against Westminster City Council’s earlier decision to refuse permission for the practice’s Leconfield House proposals in Mayfair.

An EPR spokesperson said the practice was ‘proud’ of its scheme, which it said ‘looked to retain and repurpose the original fabric of the building’ in Curzon Street.

They added: ‘We continue to work ... to deliver a scheme that looks to reuse the existing building while bringing about social and cultural infrastructure to the local economy.

EPR applied in February 2020 to add three storeys beneath the existing Leconfield House and convert its plant area into a roof terrace as part of an overhaul to create a 70-bedroom hotel with a spa and restaurants.

After a series of amendments were made including reducing the height of the proposals and removing living walls, the council’s planning applications sub-committee resolved to grant consent.

However, before the formal approval was given, Westminster adopted a new City Plan and the application was sent back to the committee for reappraisal.

In August 2021, councillors refused consent on grounds that included ‘serious impact on the quality of life of neighbours’ during excavation works.

A spokesperson added: 'While our proposals were initially approved at planning committee in December 2020 under Westminster’s previous City Plan, it is regrettable that the new Westminster Planning Policies came into law before the planning consent could complete its legal agreement and as such, our client’s application subsequently refused.'

The project backer, Guernsey-based Leconfield House, appealed that decision and an inquiry was held in June this year.

But planning inspector AJ Mageean dismissed the appeal, finding conflict with City Plan Policy 45, which seeks to control excavation in dense urban areas.

‘I have identified concerns in relation to the site’s accessibility and also its proximity to the Chesterfield House flats,’ said the inspector in a decision published this month. 'As a result, both the construction process and its associated traffic, which would be in operation over a prolonged period of time, would cause adverse effects for neighbouring occupiers and uses.'’

The decision notice added that the proposed change of use of the building would conflict with City Plan Policy 13, which aims to protect office space in this district.

Trumpet the bloodhound wins Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show; French bulldog co-owned by NFL's Morgan Fox takes second

TARRYTOWN, N.Y. -- Now this hound has something to toot his horn about.A bloodhound named Trumpet won the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show on Wednesday night, marking the first time the breed has snared U.S. dogdom's most coveted best in show prize.Rounding the finalists' ring with a poised and powerful stride, Trumpet beat a French bulldog, a German shepherd, a Maltese, an English setter, a Samoyed and a Lakeland terrier to take the trophy."I was shocked," said handler, co-breeder and co-owner Heather Helmer (...

TARRYTOWN, N.Y. -- Now this hound has something to toot his horn about.

A bloodhound named Trumpet won the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show on Wednesday night, marking the first time the breed has snared U.S. dogdom's most coveted best in show prize.

Rounding the finalists' ring with a poised and powerful stride, Trumpet beat a French bulldog, a German shepherd, a Maltese, an English setter, a Samoyed and a Lakeland terrier to take the trophy.

"I was shocked," said handler, co-breeder and co-owner Heather Helmer (who also goes by Heather Buehner), noting that the competition was stiff. "Sometimes I feel the bloodhound is a bit of an underdog."

After making dog-show history, does Trumpet have a sense of how special he is?

"I think he does," his Berlin Center, Ohio-based handler said.

After his victory, Trumpet posed patiently for photos, eventually starting to do what bloodhounds do best -- sniff around. He examined some decorative flowers that had been set up for the pictures, not appearing to find anything of note.

Winston, a French bulldog co-owned by NFL defensive lineman Morgan Fox, took second in the nation's most prestigious dog show.

"I'm just so proud of him and the whole team," Fox said by text afterward.

Fox, who was just signed by the Los Angeles Chargers and has played for the Los Angeles Rams and the Carolina Panthers, got Winston from his grandmother, Sandy Fox. She has bred and shown Frenchies for years.

Fox grew up with one and said that as he watched Winston mature, he knew the dog was a winner in both appearance and character. He went into Westminster as the top-ranked dog in the country.

"He's a joy to be around," Fox said by phone before Winston's award. "He always walks around with as much of a smile on his face as a dog can have."

The seven finalists also included Striker, a Samoyed that also made the finals last year; River, a big-winning German shepherd; MM the Lakeland terrier; Belle the English setter; and a Maltese that clearly was aiming for stardom: Her name is Hollywood.

After topping the canine rankings last year, Striker has lately been hitting a few dog shows "to keep his head in the game," handler Laura King said.

What makes the snow-white Samoyed shine in competition? "His heart," said King, of Milan, Illinois.

"His charisma shows when he's showing," and he vocally complains when he's not, she said.

While he was quiet in the ring, an Alaskan Malamute provided a yowling soundtrack for a semifinal round featuring the Samoyed and other breeds classified as working dogs.

The competition drew more than 3,000 purebred dogs, ranging from Affenpinschers to Yorkshire terriers. The goal is to crown the dog that most represents the ideal for its breed.

Usually held in winter at New York City's Madison Square Garden, the show moved to the suburban Lyndhurst estate last year and this year because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Some dogs, such as golden retrievers, faced dozens of competitors just to win their breed and move on to the semifinals. Others were among few representatives of rare breeds.

Ooma was the only Chinook that showed up. The sled-pullers are the official dog of the state of New Hampshire, but they're rare nationwide.

"I would love to see a couple more" in the Westminster ring, said Ooma's breeder, owner and handler, Patti Richards of West Haven, Vermont. "Without people who will show and breed, we're in danger of losing our breed."

Even for hopefuls that didn't come away with a ribbon, the event was an opportunity to showcase dogs and all they can do.

Bonnie the Brittany is owner-handler Dr. Jessica Sielawa's first show dog, and their teamwork extends beyond the ring.

Bonnie accompanies Sielawa to work at her chiropractic practice in Syracuse, New York, where "she's really helped people with their emotional stress," Sielawa said.

She plans to get her show dog certified as a therapy dog, too.

9 New Restaurants Worth Visiting in Broomfield, Westminster, and Lafayette

Get excited: Two of them have drive-thrus.The Local newsletter is your free, daily guide to life in Colorado. For locals, by locals. Sign up today!Yes, Denver is experiencing a bit of a restaurant boom right now, but guess what? So are the ‘burbs. In the northwest cities of Westminster, Lafayette, and Broomfield, sexy steakhouses, cool breweries, and niche eateries are opening—and these new spots also come with a side of ample, free parking, so take that RiNo! Here, nine new restaurants—all of...

Get excited: Two of them have drive-thrus.

The Local newsletter is your free, daily guide to life in Colorado. For locals, by locals. Sign up today!

Yes, Denver is experiencing a bit of a restaurant boom right now, but guess what? So are the ‘burbs. In the northwest cities of Westminster, Lafayette, and Broomfield, sexy steakhouses, cool breweries, and niche eateries are opening—and these new spots also come with a side of ample, free parking, so take that RiNo! Here, nine new restaurants—all of which have debuted in the past six months—where you can get everything from ultra-crispy Korean fried chicken to Detroit-style pizza to buckets of sweet potato fries.

Give the people what they want—and the people always want pizza. Ghost Box Pizza began as a ghost kitchen concept out of Acreage by Stem Ciders during the height of the pandemic, but the cheesy-crusted pies were so beloved that Ghost Box opened its own brick-and-mortar in downtown Lafayette. Besides the fan-favorite Detroit-style pizzas, Ghost Box also serves a good range of hoagies, salads, and wood-fired ’za. 103 S. Public Rd., Lafayette

Part brewery, part restaurant, and part arcade, Windfall Brewing Co. wants to be Westminster’s go-to for good times. On the menu: a wide range of beers, seriously good burgers, and vintage pinball. Oh, and there’s funnel cake, because when was the last time you ate a funnel cake while playing vintage pinball? 14694 Orchard Pkwy Ste 400, Westminster

Fried chicken connoisseurs know that there’s something different about the Korean version, which includes a lighter, snappier crust—and Mono Mono Korean Fried Chicken has it down. One of the best spots in the state for KFC opened a third outpost in Lafayette in early 2022, and fried-bird lovers have been flocking to it for seasoned-to-order wings, spicy sandwiches, and sauced (or not) fried chicken poppers and drumsticks. 599 Crossing Dr., Lafayette

Westbound & Down Mill opened at the end of 2021 with a menu focused on two very crowd-pleasing things: beer and pizza. While the award-winning beers might initially get you through the door (including 18 on tap), the beer-infused, sourdough-crusted pizzas, with toppings like green chile sausage, Castelvetrano olives, and romesco sauce, are what will keep you coming back. 2755 Dagny Way Ste. 101, Lafayette; 303-593-0120

Spicy chicken sandwiches are having a moment, and now Westminster’s moment involves a drive-thru. Chicken Rebel, the former food truck known for its towering chicken sandwiches, just opened its second brick-and-mortar joint off Highway 36 with a takeout window so you can secure your bird without having to leave the comfort of your Subaru. All the chicken sandies, including the popular Rancher loaded up with bacon, avocado, and buttermilk ranch, are sous vide for an extra tender, juicy bite. 10448 Town Center Dr., Westminster

At two-month-old Donutsville Bakery & Cafe off Sheridan Boulevard—which also has a drive-thru—you can order all the best breakfast fare: glossy cake and yeasted doughnuts in more than a dozen flavors, hearty croissant and bagel sammies, and an assortment of coffees, boba teas, and smoothies. Want the best of both doughnut worlds? Try the Double Decker, a glazed beauty with a chocolate cake topping. 5191 W. 112th Ave., Ste. 700, Westminster

Delvickio’s Italian is now La Distileria Latin cuisine, and the food is a little more personal for the former Delvickio’s co-owner, who wanted to bring the flavors he grew up eating in Mexico City to Broomfield. The expansive menu ranges from the indulgent quesabirria (the love child of birria tacos and a quesadilla) to fresh shrimp mango ceviche to lesser-known dishes like the chuletas, seared pork chops stuffed with spinach, mushrooms, and onions. Wash it all down with mezcal and tequila flights. 1100 Hwy. 287, Broomfield

Built around the eternally right equation of beer plus burgers equals delicious things, Tap & Burger delivers on its name. There are taps, and there are burgers. There are also buckets of fries, sweet potato tots, and onion rings. So maybe they should change the name to Tap & Burger & Buckets, but for now it’s just Tap & Burger, which is now open in the downtown Westminster development. 8810 Westminster Blvd., Westminster

For an amped-up steakhouse experience, check out Law’s Chophouse in the Orchard Town Center development. The sides menu alone is 13 dishes deep, with truffled mac and cheese, creamy goat cheese grits, and roasted fingerling potatoes—and the meat and seafood entrées are almost equally varied. Throw in some wine and craft cocktails and this is the spot to go when you’re feeling fancy on a Wednesday night. 14694 Orchard Pkwy, Westminster

Residents in Westminster mobile home park form blockade to keep out tow trucks

Copy This Embed Code: Ad Neighbors in a Westminster mobile home park are so desperate to protect their vehicles from being towed, they are forming a blockade at night to keep tow trucks out of their community.WESTMINSTER, Colo. — Neighbors in a Westminster mobile home park are so desperate to protect their vehicles from being towed, they are forming a blockade at night to keep tow trucks out of their community.Tyler Thomas says it all started after residents received a letter from management at the Highview ...

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Neighbors in a Westminster mobile home park are so desperate to protect their vehicles from being towed, they are forming a blockade at night to keep tow trucks out of their community.

WESTMINSTER, Colo. — Neighbors in a Westminster mobile home park are so desperate to protect their vehicles from being towed, they are forming a blockade at night to keep tow trucks out of their community.

Tyler Thomas says it all started after residents received a letter from management at the Highview Mobile Home Community last November announcing a rule — no more than three cars in a driveway. A few months later, he says, the managers started towing people's cars.

"If you have two parents who are working and two kids with jobs, I mean, that's four cars right there," said Thomas. "So right there, one of their cars is going to get towed."

That's what happened to Eugene Shepherd, who has lived at Highview for 14 years. He says his work truck has been targeted twice in late-night towing raids.

"It cost me $950 to get it from them the first time," said Shepherd. "What's happening is they're targeting work vehicles, collector vehicles and high-dollar vehicles. These are heavier, so they can charge more."

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In an impromptu neighborhood meeting, about a dozen neighbors said they had received notices that their cars would be towed, even people who had specifically paved their driveways to park more cars.

Ariceli Solis has lived at Highview for 14 years. She says her two teenage sons have cars, along with her and her husband, and they have no place else to park except their driveway.

"This hurts me very bad," Solis said, in Spanish. "They've been giving us warning after warning constantly to move our cars, and we need our cars. They say to park on the street outside the trailer park, but they tow there, too. And people have had their cars stolen."

Solis says another new rule limits the number of animals to one, and she has three dogs.

"One of my dogs I've had for 12 years," she said, sobbing. "I have three dogs and they're bothering me about the three that I do have. They have never done things like this before."

Residents say they are not against tow operators targeting inoperable vehicles or cars parked illegally on the street.

"We'll help them tow it," said Thomas. "We just want to be able to park our working cars in our driveways."

Meanwhile, the office at Highview was locked on Tuesday.

The owner, Martin Duman, did not want to speak on camera, but stated his park is not the bad guy for limiting cars to three.

"The units are small, and the place looked too cluttered," said Duman. "The majority of the tenants are for it. We're trying to improve the eyesight of the community."

The Rocky Mountain Home Association told Contact Denver7 that overparking in mobile home communities can create issues with safety and fairness, and that courts routinely allow a three-vehicle-max rule to be made and enforced.

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Residents filed a lawsuit this week to have the towing stopped. In the meantime, they have been banding together at night to block the community's entrance to tow trucks.

"It's either that or let them steal our cars," said Thomas.

Editor's note: Denver7 seeks out audience tips and feedback to help people in need, resolve problems and hold the powerful accountable. If you know of a community need our call center could address, or have a story idea for our investigative team to pursue, please email us at contact7@thedenverchannel.com or call (720) 462-7777. Find more Contact Denver7 stories here.

Marczyk Fine Foods Is Opening a Westminster Store

The Local newsletter is your free, daily guide to life in Colorado. For locals, by locals. Sign up today!More than 30 years ago, a young Pete Marczyk moved West to make a name for himself. This year—as his namesake local food market celebrates 20 years in Denver and prepares to open a third retail location—it seems he’s done exactly that. Marczyk Fine Foods has grown and evolved over the last two decades, but at its core, the...

The Local newsletter is your free, daily guide to life in Colorado. For locals, by locals. Sign up today!

More than 30 years ago, a young Pete Marczyk moved West to make a name for himself. This year—as his namesake local food market celebrates 20 years in Denver and prepares to open a third retail location—it seems he’s done exactly that. Marczyk Fine Foods has grown and evolved over the last two decades, but at its core, the grocery store has stayed true to Marczyk’s early vision of creating a friendly neighborhood market with products from around the world. “I want people to come into our store and say, ‘Wow, this is really cool, I haven’t seen this since I was traveling in Italy,’ or, ‘I never see this anymore, I wonder where they got that,” says Marczyk, who co-owns the business with his wife, Barbara Macfarlane, and his brother, Paul.

Marczyk’s journey to the grocery business started in 1991, when the then-23-year-old moved to Denver from the East Coast for a fresh start. He wanted to learn how to ski, but he also wanted to forge his own path in the Centennial State. Marczyk grew up in western Massachusetts, where generations of families have lived for decades and everyone seems to know everyone else, he says. “In the northeast, if you apply for a job, you may end up being interviewed by someone who knew your grandfather or your aunt or your second cousin, and if they like them, fine, but if they don’t, you aren’t getting the job,” Marczyk says. “I just wanted to go someplace where I could plant my own flag.”

After spending nearly 10 years as a stockbroker in Denver, learning some of the ins and outs of finance first-hand, Marczyk decided it was time to strike out on his own. And so, along with his wife and business partner Macfarlane, he began planning for what would eventually become Marczyk Fine Foods. Marczyk grew up in a family that cooked and gardened and, as an adult, he spent much of his free time seeking interesting foods, so he was surprised by the dearth of local grocery stores and markets in Colorado. “There was a need in Denver,” he says. “There was very little in the way of homegrown retail food and certainly not right in Denver proper.”

The first Marczyk grocery store opened in spring 2002 in Denver’s Uptown neighborhood, where it still stands today. The first two years were a struggle, and when the husband-and-wife team finally got their burgeoning store on somewhat stable financial footing, Marczyk realized he needed some help. He turned to his younger brother, Paul, who had separately moved to Denver and embarked on a successful career as a brewer. “He’s a very process-oriented guy, very operationally oriented—I was more of an arm-waver and a big talker and he was more like, ‘Yeah, how about we put that on paper and figure out how we can actually do it,’” Marczyk says. “Paul really solidified the business and turned it into something we had envisioned.”

With Paul’s operational chops, the grocery business began to thrive. They retrofitted the Uptown store with a tiny “MacGyver kitchen,” Marczyk says, and, for the first time, began making soups, salads, sandwiches, and other prepared foods. Then, in 2011, they opened a second store on the border of the Mayfair and Park Hill neighborhoods. It was there that they began baking the fresh baguettes that Marczyk is so well-known for today. “The bread was so successful and so popular that we’ve made baguettes practically every day since we started 10 years ago,” Marczyk says.

In 2020, the team completed renovations on a 10,000-square-foot Park Hill building and made it the store’s commissary kitchen, where they now make all of the bread and savory prepared foods sold in the stores (it also serves as the company headquarters). And, sometime within the next year, the Marczyk grocery empire will be expanding once again: It is working with the City of Westminster to open a retail store in the new Downtown Westminster development.

What has—and will likely continue to—set Marczyk Fine Foods apart is its carefully curated selection of products, which range from private label olive oil imported from Spain to seafood flown in daily by Seattle Fish Co. to center-of-the-plate pork, lamb, and beef cuts from Westminster-based Niman Ranch. Marczyk has just 3,000 unique products, whereas a typical big-box grocery store has between 30,000 and 60,000. That careful editing, as Marczyk calls it, ensures shoppers can find exactly what they’re looking for without any distractions. “I always wanted to have a place where it’s not everything, it’s just everything you need,” he says. “If you look at the New York Times recipe of the day, it is rare that we don’t have an ingredient in there.

And though Marczyk began offering touchless curbside pickup during the pandemic, the company is also doubling-down on customer service basics like greeting shoppers, carrying their bags to the car, and helpfully answering questions. “The feedback we get from people is that our staff blows them away, day in and day out,” Paul says. “That’s the differentiator. That’s why people come back to us. People say, ‘I just want to go somewhere where someone’s going to answer my question and tell me how to cook this,’ and the further other stores get away from that, it does open the door for us.”

Marczyk Fine Foods is celebrating its 20th anniversary with events the weekend of May 13–15: burger night and a job fair at the Colfax store from 5–7 p.m. on May 13; vendor demos from 10 a.m.–p.m. at the 17th Avenue store on May 14; and vendor demos at the Colfax store on May 15.

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