appliance repair in Highlands Ranch, CO

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Appliance Repair Highlands Ranch, CO

What Clients Say About Us

Delivering industry-leading repair work at cost-conscious pricing is one of our top priorities. So, don't hesitate to call our office if you find yourself in a bind - even on weekends.

When you choose to have Highlands Ranch's Best Appliance Repair to visit your home in an emergency, you can count on:

  • Open Communication
  • Trustworthy Advice
  • Quick Turnaround Times
  • Honest Pricingb
  • Hard Work
  • Long-Lasting Repairs for Your Appliances

Taking this approach gives us the chance to fix your appliance quickly, so you don't have to stress about what to do next. If you have a unique or older appliance that needs fixing, don't sweat it - our experienced appliance technicians can repair just about any appliance under the sun. Whether it's refrigerator repair, washer repair, stove repair, or any other kind of appliance repair, we're here to fix the problem when you're ready.

When we say we repair just about every appliance under the sun, we mean it. Here are just a few of our most popular appliance repair specialties:

Common Signs You Need Dishwasher Repair in Highlands Ranch, COUnusual Cooking Times

Appliance Repair Highlands Ranch, CO

Clean Dishes Are Cool to Touch After Removing: For dishes to be clean and germ-free, you need hot, soapy water for washing. The FDA recommends using water around 110 degrees Fahrenheit, which is uncomfortable for handwashing but perfect for dishwashing machines. If you find that your dishes are cold and clammy instead of hot and steamy when you remove them, your dishwasher might need a new heating coil.

Appliance Repair Highlands Ranch, CO

Dishwasher Isn't Draining: You'll know quickly if your dishwasher isn't draining properly because there will be a pool of water under your machine. If you're dealing with drainage problems, it could be due to a clogged drainage system or non-functioning pump.

Appliance Repair Highlands Ranch, CO

Leaky Dishwasher: As one of our most requested appliance repairer services, we help customers deal with leaky dishwashers all the time. This common problem can be caused by a damaged door gasket, leaky dishwasher tub, loose valve, or another issue.

Common Signs You Need Refrigerator Repair in Highlands Ranch, CO

Appliance Repair Highlands Ranch, CO

Loud Humming and Vibrating Noises: Hearing vibrating and humming sounds from your fridge is not uncommon. In fact, these noises are a normal part of your refrigerator's operation. However, they shouldn't be very noisy at all. If you hear unusually loud knocking, humming, or vibrating, you could have a problem on your hands. Whether it's a faulty compressor or a blocked condenser fan, our team will diagnose the problem and get to work fixing your fridge.

Appliance Repair Highlands Ranch, CO

Spoiled Food: The whole point of putting your food in the refrigerator is so it doesn't spoil. So, if you notice your food spoiling prematurely, it's a good sign that you need appliance repair for your refrigerator. Because of the nature of these repairs, it's important to hire a licensed repair technician to find and correct the root cause of your problem.

Appliance Repair Highlands Ranch, CO

Water on Floor Underneath Fridge: If you spot standing water under your refrigerator, it's a big cause for concern. Not just for the health of your appliance, but for water leaking into your home. Usually, leaks are caused by trapped condensation due to clogged pipes or hoses. You'll need an experienced refrigerator repair tech to clear blockages and ultimately solve your leaking problem.

Common Signs You Need Oven or Stove Repair in Highlands Ranch, CO

Appliance Repair Highlands Ranch, CO

Unusual Cooking Times: Are your grandma's time-tested recipes being burnt or undercooked? Have you had to change cooking times for your family's favorite meals? Unusual differences in cooking times are a telltale sign that your oven needs to be repaired by a professional.

Appliance Repair Highlands Ranch, CO

Oven Won't CloseElectrical Problems: It might seem minor on the surface, but when your oven door doesn't close, you can't cook your food properly. Chances are you need a licensed oven repair technician to refit or replace the hinges on your oven door, so you can get back to cooking.

Appliance Repair Highlands Ranch, CO

Electrical Problems: If you have an electric oven and notice that it cuts off during cooking or won't turn on at all, you might need oven repair. Like gas, electrical problems are best remedied by professionals, like those you'll find at Highlands Ranch's Best Appliance Repair.

Your Best Choice for Expert Appliance Repair in Highlands Ranch, CO

Whatever appliance repair issue you need solving, there is no problem too big or small for our team to handle. There's a reason why we call ourselves Highlands Ranch's Best Appliance Repair: because we offer the total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Highlands Ranch, we fix all major domestic and foreign brands with unbeatable deals and 100% customer satisfaction.

Customers choose our company for their appliance repairs because we provide:

  • Service to All Major Brands
  • Over 25 Years of Appliance Repair Experience
  • 7-Day and Emergency Services
  • Best Warranty in Town: 5-Year Parts and 6 Months Labor
  • Friendly, Helpful Customer Service
  • Licensed & Insured Work
  • Free Estimates
  • Mobile Service = We Come to You!

Whether you need emergency repairs for your clothes washer or need routine appliance maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations.

Physical-therapy-phone-number303-536-3873

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Latest News in Highlands Ranch, CO

Broncos defensive bios: Justin Simmons & Co. feature improved secondary, pass rush

Last year, en route to a sixth consecutive season missing the playoffs, the defense was the strongest pillar of the Broncos. The unit finished third in the NFL in average points allowed at 18.9 and eighth in average yards allowed at 326.1. Now with Russell Wilson bringing playoff expectations back to Denver, the corresponding expectation is the Denver defense can be even better than it was last year. A revamped secondary and key free agent additions (D.J Jones, Randy Gregory, K’Waun Williams) are big reasons for that optimism.D...

Last year, en route to a sixth consecutive season missing the playoffs, the defense was the strongest pillar of the Broncos. The unit finished third in the NFL in average points allowed at 18.9 and eighth in average yards allowed at 326.1. Now with Russell Wilson bringing playoff expectations back to Denver, the corresponding expectation is the Denver defense can be even better than it was last year. A revamped secondary and key free agent additions (D.J Jones, Randy Gregory, K’Waun Williams) are big reasons for that optimism.

Defensive end

6-3, 281, 25, 4th season, Ohio State

Jones appeared in a career-high 16 games last year, with seven starts. He didn’t have a sack until Week 8, then reeled off 5.5 sacks and 10 solo tackles in a six-game span. If he can bottle that consistency this year, Jones could truly break out as a pass-rushing force.

6-6, 320, 24, Rookie, Iowa State

The Broncos added to their D-line depth by selecting Uwazurike in the fourth round (No. 116). A first-team All-Big 12 selection in 2021, he had nine sacks for the Cyclones last year. He has a learning curve in front of him, but the Broncos hope that his playmaking ability shows up.

Nose tackle

6-0, 305, 27, 6th season, Mississippi

With Shelby Harris gone to Seattle in the Russell Wilson trade, the Broncos re-fortified the defensive line by signing Jones to a three-year deal. In five years in San Francisco, Jones played 61 regular season games (46 starts), with 23 tackles for loss and seven sacks.

6-3, 328, 31, 7th season, Wyoming

The Highlands Ranch High School product knows he needs to re-establish himself as a plug up front against the run after his 2021 was ended by a foot injury, and he missed four games last year with a broken thumb and COVID. Step No. 1 for Purcell is staying healthy.

Defensive end

6-1, 291, 29, 5th season, Clemson

Williams proved himself as dependable depth on the defensive line the past two seasons, appearing in 29 games (19 starts). Now he gets the chance to start. He has three sacks and 76 tackles since 2020, and will see plenty of action this year.

6-3, 291, 23, Rookie, Wisconsin

Henningsen missed most of rookie minicamp with a calf injury, but returned in time for training camp to make an impression. He still needs to work on finishing plays in the backfield, but has a high athletic upside and provides valuable depth on the defensive line.

Outside linebacker

6-4, 275, 26, 5th season, N.C. State

The No. 5 overall pick in the 2018 draft enters a huge year after an ACL tear wiped out most of his 2020 and ankle issues plagued his 2021. The result was no sacks in seven games last year, and the Broncos are counting on a bounce-back season from Chubb.

6-4, 257, 24, 2nd season, Ohio State

Cooper underwent three heart surgeries after the Broncos drafted him in the seventh round in 2021. This year brought another hurdle when Cooper tore his finger tendon in the first OTA, knocking him out for three months. He had 2.5 sacks last year, showing flashes.

6-4, 245, 25, 2nd season, Eastern Kentucky

Signed to the active roster last September in the wake of Bradley Chubb’s injury, Patrick made a strong impression in his first year as a reserve and core special teamer, where he played 72% of the snaps. His strength on those units made his roster case strong this year.

Inside linebacker

6-1, 236, 27, 5th season, Iowa

Jewell was off to a strong start last year before tearing his pectoral in Week 2. He returns this year as the “green dot” play-caller on defense, and will be expected to rack up tackles in addition to keeping youngsters like Justin Strnad and Jonas Griffith in their lane.

6-3, 235, 25, 3rd season, Wake Forest

After missing his rookie season with a wrist injury, Strnad appeared in 16 games last year, with five starts. He had 36 tackles (23 solo) in an up-and-down performance overall; he’ll surely get more chances this year to grow at the position and prove his worth for the future.

Inside linebacker

6-4, 250, 25, 2nd season, Indiana State

Griffith dislocated his elbow in the preseason opener, but coach Nathaniel Hackett expects him to be available for Week 1 in Seattle. Griffith appeared in 14 games last year with three starts, registering 46 tackles (four for loss) and playing half the special teams snaps.

6-2, 240, 28, 4th season, Montana State

Denver added Singleton on a one-year deal in free agency, providing insurance at the position that paid off when Jonas Griffith went down with a preseason elbow injury. After a quiet rookie year, Singleton led Philadelphia with 120 tackles in 2020 and 137 tackles last year.

Outside linebacker

6-5, 242, 29, 6th season, Nebraska

The Broncos signed Gregory to a five-year, $70 million contract with $28 million guaranteed — big money for a guy who’s only made 12 career starts. Gregory had shoulder surgery in the offseason, but returned in training camp and is expected to be a force opposite No. 55.

6-3, 240, 23, 2nd season, Ohio State

The Broncos moved Browning from inside to outside after last year, and he gave the fans a taste of what he can do off the edge with a 12-yard sack in the preseason opener. He’s quality depth behind Gregory and Chubb, and could see his role expand depending on his play.

6-3, 240, 22, Rookie, Oklahoma

Denver’s top draft choice this year, in the second round at No. 64 overall, Bonitto has yet to show signs he’s the game-wrecking force the Broncos hoped for. But there’s still plenty of upside He’ll be edge-rushing depth and also contribute on special teams.

Cornerback

6-2, 202, 22, 2nd season, Alabama

After four interceptions in 16 games last year, including a pick-six, the sky is the limit for PS2 in Year 2. He is expected to be the Broncos’ top cornerback and will be tasked with shutting down the top wideouts in the AFC West. A Pro Bowl season could be in the cards.

5-9, 185, 31, 8th season, Pittsburgh

The Broncos signed Williams to a two-year deal in free agency to be the team’s starting nickel back. Williams originally broke into the NFL as an undrafted rookie in Cleveland, then played in 65 games (36 starts) with the 49ers, with four interceptions and 19 passes defensed.

6-1, 200, 24, 3rd season, Iowa

After a baptism-by-fire as a rookie, appearing in all 16 games with 11 starts, Ojemudia only played two games last year due to a hamstring injury. He provides depth on the back end of the secondary and will also play special teams. He’s starting 2022 on short-term IR (elbow).

Cornerback

5-11, 193, 28, 8th season, Florida State

Darby signed a three-year, $30 million deal ahead of last season, and was limited to 11 games in his first season in Denver due to hamstring/shoulder injuries. The Broncos need picks out of him; Darby has eight career interceptions but none since Week 12 of 2019.

5-11, 195, 23, rookie, Pittsburgh

Denver’s fourth-round pick, Mathis earned the trust of the coaching staff during training camp and saw a lot of action in the preseason, running with the No. 1 defense in practice when Ronald Darby had a chest injury. Mathis could be this year’s breakout secondary star.

5-10, 190, 24, 3rd season, Wake Forest

Bassey made the Broncos as an undrafted free agent in 2020, and played in 12 games that year, with three starts and one interception. It’s been rocky since: He spent most of 2021 recovering from a knee injury, and projects as the backup nickel back behind Williams.

Free safety

6-2, 202, 28, 8th season, Boston College

The unquestioned captain of the defense, Simmons has 21 career interceptions in 91 games (81 starts). His Ironman snap streak came to an end last year, but he’s just one of two NFL players with 400 total tackles and 20 interceptions since he entered the league in 2016.

6-1, 207, 22, 2nd season, Texas

After making an impact in a dime role last year, with two interceptions, two sacks and 28 tackles in 15 games, Sterns will again be an important reserve. He won’t see many snaps at safety, but will be a core special teams player and appear in defensive sub-packages.

Strong safety

5-10, 183, 34, 12th season, Alabama

The oldest player on the Broncos’ defense, Jackson re-signed with the Broncos on a one-year deal in the offseason. He has four interceptions and 248 tackles over the last three seasons in Denver, and will again be the vocal leader of the D along with Simmons.

5-10, 202, 25, 4th season, Texas

Locke got his start in Denver on the practice squad in 2019, and over the past two seasons he’s made his mark as a core special teams player, getting 83.5% of those snaps. That will be Locke’s role again this year unless there’s a swath of injuries ahead of him at safety.

5-11, 200, 22, Rookie, Oklahoma

Denver’s fifth-round pick this year, Turner-Yell had a strong preseason finale against the Vikings that helped cement his roster spot, beating out veteran J.R. Reed and others. He won’t see much time defensively unless there’s injuries, but will contribute on special teams.

Punter

6-2, 210, 27, 2nd season, South Alabama

The Broncos released incumbent starter Sam Martin on the final cut-down day, opting to give the job to Waitman instead. Claimed off waivers from Pittsburgh in February, Waitman had seven punts for the Steelers in 2021 (52.1 average).

Long snapper

6-2, 235, 25, 3rd season, Northern Colorado

After beating out Wes Farnsworth for the long snapper job during 2020 training camp, Bobenmoyer’s taken the job and run with it. He appeared in all 33 games over the past two years and the former Wyoming prep star will again be a pillar on special teams in 2022.

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Where to Eat in Highlands Ranch

The Local newsletter is your free, daily guide to life in Colorado. For locals, by locals. Sign up today!Highlands Ranch is undergoing a food-fueled renaissance of sorts, with new outposts of Postino Wine Bar, Prost Brewing, and Lazy Dog cropping up in the suburb in the past year alone. And it’s a good thing, too. The metro district (which isn’t technically a city, but a 22,000-acre “m...

The Local newsletter is your free, daily guide to life in Colorado. For locals, by locals. Sign up today!

Highlands Ranch is undergoing a food-fueled renaissance of sorts, with new outposts of Postino Wine Bar, Prost Brewing, and Lazy Dog cropping up in the suburb in the past year alone. And it’s a good thing, too. The metro district (which isn’t technically a city, but a 22,000-acre “master-planned community” founded in 1981) has more than 100,000 residents, and has been named one of the fastest-growing areas in the country—all culminating in a hunger for better fare. Here, check out 11 of the best spots to grab a bite in the ’burb directly south of I-470.

Postino Highlands Ranch

The three-week-old Postino Highlands Ranch, with its retro-chic decor (see: brown-and-orange striped wallpaper, yellow velvet couch, and board-game-adorned feature wall), offers a funky reprieve from the area’s sea of cookie-cutter chains. Here, suburbanites gather ’round the thoughtfully curated wine list and shareables like smoked salmon served with whipped feta cheese and assorted mushrooms with lemony labneh. Grab a seat on the shady patio lined with bright-orange banquettes, and make sure you visit for the daily happy hour, when glasses of grapes are just $6 until 5 p.m. 1497 Park Central Dr., Highlands Ranch

Zell’s Mountain Creperie

DTC-based entrepreneur Jim Beatty opened Zell’s this past July to bring European-inspired crêpes to the suburbs. Breakfast varieties come with your choice of bacon, ham, or bruschetta mixed with eggs, and for lunch, we like the thin pancakes filled with ham, brie, and fig preserves. Of course, there’s a sweet crêpe for any preference, from seasonal peaches and cream to the classics: Nutella, banana, and strawberry. Order ahead or watch the team make your selection to order on the traditional round griddles. 2229 Wildcat Reserve Parkway, Ste. A4, Highlands Ranch

Lazy Dog Restaurant & Bar

Lazy Dog is a chain, yes, but with four of its 45 locations located in Colorado, this California-based bar and eatery feels like it’s part of the family—and a sprawling Highlands Ranch site is the newest member. The multi-page menu can be daunting until you realize that it’s all about comfort food, with soul-pleasing plates like chicken pot pie, pot roast with mashed potatoes, and a burger menu eight dishes deep. There’s even a new orange Tang-infused margarita and take-home, frozen TV dinners that deliver an extra hit of nostalgia. 43 Centennial Blvd., Highlands Ranch

Prost Brewing

This 11,000-square-foot, lager-lovers paradise has, hands-down, the busiest patio in town, with dozens of community picnic tables, lawn games, a stage, and ample heaters for cool-weather dining. While half-liters and liters of Prost’s notable German brews are the draw, there’s also a hearty menu of wursts and schnitzels to make a meal out of your visit. Try the Biergarten burger, topped with butterkäse cheese, beer-braised onions, German mustard, and cranberry sauce. 53 Centennial Blvd., Highlands Ranch

Highland’s Indian Cuisine

Highlands Ranch got its first Indian restaurant in early 2021 with the addition of Highland’s Indian Cuisine, a destination for masalas, biryani, and tandoor-fired offerings from around the subcontinent. Start with an order of juicy, steamed chicken momos before moving on to a bevy of traditional curries from the chef’s specialties menu. We like the tangy, onion- and tomato-sauce-based sweet potato masala and the fish korma, which is cooked in a light, cashew-based sauce. 9344 Dorchester St., Ste. 101, Highlands Ranch

Grist Brewing Company

The original brewery outpost of the Grist family of pubs (which now includes two themed cocktail bars in Lone Tree and Baker) is tucked into a quiet office park where imbibing seems like a fireable offense. But the comforts of a perfect neighborhood watering hole—a massive central bar, garage-door-accessible patio, ample TVs looping sports, and a wellspring of craft brews—make you forget where you are. Pick your dram and pair it with a snack from the in-house kitchen, which prepares pub grub like fried cheese curds, barbecue pulled-pork sandos, and burgers. 9150 Commerce Center Circle, Ste. 300, Highlands Ranch

Abo’s Pizza

The southernmost location of Abo’s Pizza delivers eats for any appetite—especially a hearty one—with a fount of dough-based pleasures going well beyond the famous New York–style slices (which are available à la carte if you dine in). Go for giant calzones made for sharing, butter-drenched garlic knots, and honey-garlic-glazed meatballs. The pizza list runs deep, and you can (and should) order a half-and-half pie to try two varieties at once. Heat seekers: Go for the Inferno, which, with its spicy Italian sausage, chorizo, and seed-in jalapeños, lives up to its name. 2229 Wildcat Reserve Parkway, Ste. A1, Highlands Ranch

Los Dos Potrillos

Of the four locations of Los Dos Potrillos along the I-470 corridor, the Highlands Ranch outpost may be the most beloved, with its breezy rooftop patio, labyrinthine dining room, and generous weekday happy hour (4–6 p.m.), when 16-ounce margaritas are just $5. Mexican comforts abound, but we like a hearty bowl of tableside-prepared guac and the communal Taquiza platter, where up to four guests can top their own street tacos from a field of carne asada and adobada, chicken, nopales, and onions. 35 Springer Dr., Highlands Ranch

Little Holly’s Asian Cafe

Located on the southwest side of town, Little Holly’s Asian Cafe serves pan-Asian delights from Thai curries to bento boxes to Peking duck. While the generous portion sizes make any of the $14 to $26 entrées a bargain, we recommend dining in for lunch, when most everything is under $11, including the Yushan chicken with carrots, broccoli, and peas wok-fried in a dark and tangy soy-based sauce. The price even includes egg drop or hot and sour soup and a crispy egg roll. 2223 W. Wildcat Reserve Parkway, Highlands Ranch

Lansdowne Arms

This 17-year-old Irish pub in Highlands Ranch Town Center is a lively place to grab a pint and a plate (best enjoyed on the rooftop patio, if it’s open). Fish and chips and bangers and mash—made with Tommyknocker beer sausages—are evergreen on the menu, and slow-roasted prime rib is served Friday to Sunday while it lasts. But the real draw is what’s behind the black-painted, Irish-style bar: an impressive lineup of Irish, Scotch, and single-malt whiskeys alongside imported suds like Guinness, Smithwicks, and Stella on tap. 9352 Dorchester St., Highlands Ranch

Honey B’s Macarons

No culinary tour of Highlands Ranch would be complete without stopping at Honey B’s Macarons, a specialty boutique that crafts more than 80 flavors of the meringue-based confections using classic French techniques. The current lineup includes temptations like pink peppercorn and violet-cassis flavors alongside tried-and-true parfums such as rose, red velvet, and orange dream. You can also indulge in alcohol-infused macarons, like the coffee ganache variety speared with a pipette of Bailey’s Irish Cream. 40 Springer Dr., Highlands Ranch

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A Local’s Guide to Eating and Drinking in Littleton Where to Eat and Drink in Longmont Right Now

Contracts For Aug. 31, 2022

AIR FORCEThe Boeing Co., Defense, Space & Security, Seattle, Washington, has been awarded a $2,214,952,163 modification (P00215) to contract FA8625-11-C-6600 for KC-46A Air Force Production Lot 8 aircraft, subscriptions and licenses. The contract modification provides for the exercise of an option for an additional quantity of 15 KC-46A aircraft, data, subscriptions and licenses being produced under the basic contract. Work will be performed in Seattle, Washington, and is expected to be completed by Nov. 30, 2025....

AIR FORCE

The Boeing Co., Defense, Space & Security, Seattle, Washington, has been awarded a $2,214,952,163 modification (P00215) to contract FA8625-11-C-6600 for KC-46A Air Force Production Lot 8 aircraft, subscriptions and licenses. The contract modification provides for the exercise of an option for an additional quantity of 15 KC-46A aircraft, data, subscriptions and licenses being produced under the basic contract. Work will be performed in Seattle, Washington, and is expected to be completed by Nov. 30, 2025. Fiscal 2021 aircraft procurement funds in the amount of $147,540,041; and fiscal 2022 aircraft procurement funds in the amount of $2,065,560,574 are being obligated at the time of award. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity.

The Boeing Co., Defense, Space & Security, Seattle, Washington, has been awarded a not-to-exceed $927,492,124 undefinitized contract action for four KC-46A aircraft for Israel. This contract is also issued for the non-recurring engineering design and test for the Remote Vision System 2.0 and the Air Refueling Operator Station 2.0 mission equipment and installation, pre-delivery integrated logistics support, and technical publications. Work will be performed in Seattle, Washington, and is expected to be completed by Dec. 31, 2026. This contract involves 100 percent Foreign Military Sales to Israel and is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Foreign Military Sales funds in the amount of $886,242,124 are being obligated at the time of award. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity. (FA8609-19-D-0007/FA8609-22-F-0001)

Midnight Sun-Centennial Kirratchiaq JV LLC, Anchorage, Alaska, has been awarded a $19,000,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract modification (P00002) to previously awarded contract FA480021D0008 for providing Simplified Acquisition of Base Civil Engineer Requirements support for Joint Base Langley-Eustis (JBLE), Virginia. This modification exercises Option Year One which extends the contract for one year. This contract provides all labor, tools, equipment, transportation, materials, supervision, and all other necessary supplies and services required to perform a broad range of design, minor and new construction, facility repair, and maintenance on real property for JBLE. Work will be performed at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia; and Sandston, Virginia, and is expected to be completed by Aug. 31, 2026. This single-award modification is the result of a competitive Section 8(a) set-aside for small business in which nine offers were received during the time of the original contract award. Fiscal 2022 and 2023 operations and maintenance funds will be used to fund individual task orders awarded under this contract. The 633rd Contracting Squadron, Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, is the contracting activity.

U.S. SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND

Iron Eagle X, Tampa, Florida, was awarded a contract (H92415-22-90004) with a maximum ceiling of $430,000,000 and a 10-year ordering period for a range of activities, including further research and development, products, services, and production for further technical development and applications derived from previous U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) tools and extending solutions to meet USSOCOM software solution requirements for challenges associated with a host of operational workflows and interoperability among data sets and applications in the furtherance of the program. Fiscal 2022 operations and maintenance; and fiscal 2022 research, development, test and evaluation funding in the amount of $3,877,823 are being obligated at the time of award. This contract is an Other Transaction Agreement authorized under 10 U.S. Code §4022(f). USSOCOM, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, is the contracting activity.

Clarity Innovations LLC, Columbia, Maryland, was awarded a contract (H92415-22-F-0038) valued at $10,325,029 for technical labor support such as data analysts, data scientists, data engineers, software developers, DevSecOps engineers, database administrators, Tactical Assault Kit developers, and other related technical talent labor categories. This contract will be the primary means of support for the Special Operations Command (SOCOM) vice commander-directed Data Stewardship Program lead by the SOCOM Command Data and Artificial Intelligence Office. Fiscal 2022 operations and maintenance; and fiscal 2022 research, development, test and evaluation funding in the amount of $9,675,029 is being obligated at the time of award. This contract was competed in accordance with the requirements of the Air Force basic ordering agreement FA830720G0039. Four offerors responded with proposals. Competition was set aside for small business in accordance with Federal Acquisition Regulation Part 19.502. U.S. Special Operations Command, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, is the contracting activity.

ARMY

Lockheed Martin Missiles & Fire Control, Orlando, Florida, was awarded a $121,567,721 firm-fixed-price contract for the purchase of Modernized Target Acquisition Designation Sight/Pilot Night Vision Systems components and hardware for the Apache attack helicopter. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of March 31, 2022. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-22-F-0381).

General Dynamics - Ordnance and Tactical Systems, Garland, Texas, was awarded a $93,224,681 firm-fixed-price contract for tritonal bomb components. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Dec. 31, 2024. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Rock Island Arsenal, Illinois, is the contracting activity (W52P1J-22-F-0335).

Stantec Tetra Tech JV II, Lexington, Kentucky (W91237-22-D-0021); AECOM Technical Services Inc., Los Angeles, California (W91237-22-D-0022); ABC Damn Safety JV, Highlands Ranch, Colorado (W91237-22-D-0023); and Black & Veatch - GEI JV, Overland Park, Kansas (W91237-22-D-0024), will compete for each order of the $90,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract for national dam safety engineering and design services. Bids were solicited via the internet with five received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 30, 2027. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Huntington, West Virginia, is the contracting activity.

General Electric Co., Lynn, Massachusetts, was awarded a $68,647,137 hybrid (cost-plus-award-fee, cost-plus-fixed-fee, firm-fixed-price) contract to provide support for the T700 engine. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 29, 2027. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-22-D-0045).

Wolf creek Federal Service Inc., Anchorage, Alaska, was awarded a $46,068,826 hybrid (cost-plus-fixed-fee, firm-fixed-price) contract for installation support services at U.S. Army Garrison-Redstone. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 31, 2023. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity (W9124P-22-C-P027).

PRIDE Industries, Roseville, California, was awarded a $17,771,117 modification (P00085) to contract W9124G-18-C-0005 for Fort Rucker base operations support. Work will be performed in Fort Rucker, Alabama, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 31, 2023. Fiscal 2022 operation and maintenance, Army funds in the amount of $2,961,853 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Field Directorate Office, Fort Eustis, Virginia, is the contracting activity.

General Dynamics Land Systems, Sterling Heights, Michigan, was awarded a $9,517,083 modification (P00017) to contract W56HZV-22-C-0012 for Abrams Systems technical support. Work will be performed in Sterling Heights, Michigan, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 31, 2024. Fiscal 2010 Foreign Military Sales (Poland) funds in the amount of $9,517,083 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Detroit Arsenal, Michigan, is the contracting activity.

Longbow LLC, Orlando, Florida, was awarded an $8,837,251 firm-fixed-price contract for fire control radar support. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 31, 2025. 2027. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-22-F-0412).

MISSILE DEFENSE AGENCY

Lockheed Martin Rotary and Mission Systems, Moorestown, New Jersey, is being awarded a $50,681,223 modification (P00026) to previously awarded contract HQ085121C0001 under Foreign Military Sales Case JA-P-NCO. The total value of the contract is increased from $364,367,039 to $415,048,262. Under this modification, the contractor will continue performance on existing contract line item numbers to provide timely purchasing of required parts and continued labor in the areas of computer program development, program management, engineering, logistics, and radar integration. The work will be performed in Moorestown, New Jersey. The period of performance for this action is from Sept. 1, 2022, through Nov. 30, 2022. Case JA-P-NCO funds in the amount of $50,681,223 are being obligated at the time of award. The Missile Defense Agency, Dahlgren, Virginia, is the contracting activity.

NAVY

CTC Enterprise Ventures Corp., Johnstown, Pennsylvania, is awarded $18,733,225 for ceiling-priced delivery order N00383-22-F-ZB0A under previously awarded basic ordering agreement N00383-22-G-ZB01 for the acquisition of nine spare hydraulic winches used on the H-60 aircraft. All work will be performed in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, and is expected to be completed by August 2025, with no option periods. Fiscal 2022 working capital (Navy) funds in the amount of $9,179,280 will be obligated at the time of award, and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. One company was solicited for this sole-source requirement pursuant to the authority set forth in 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), with one offer received. Naval Supply Systems Command Weapon Systems Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is the contracting activity.

Lake Assault Boats LLC,* Superior, Wisconsin, is awarded a $17,346,989 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for naval facilities Oil Spill Response Oil Pollution Skimmer boats. Work will be performed in Superior, Wisconsin, and is expected to be completed by September 2023. Fiscal 2022 other procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $1,163,563 for the first delivery order will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured through the System for Award Management website, with one offer received. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity (N00024-22-D-2287).

Alloy Surfaces Co. Inc., Chester Township, Pennsylvania, is awarded a $13,027,095 firm-fixed-price contract to manufacture of MJU-64/B and MJU-66/B aircraft decoy flares. The contract will include a base ordering period with an additional option-ordering period which if exercised, will bring the total estimated value to $29,310,966. All work will be performed in Chester Township, Pennsylvania, and ordering is expected to be completed by September 2022; if the option is exercised, ordering will be completed by late September 2022. This effort involves funding under the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) program. Funding for the MJU-64/B combines purchases with procurement of ammunition (Navy and Marine Corps) funds (86%); and FMS (Japan) funds (14%), while funding for the MJU-66/B combines procurement of ammunition (Air Force) funds (85%); and procurement of ammunition (Navy and Marine Corps) funds (15%). These combined funds in the full amount of $13,027,095 will be obligated at time of award. Funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. If the option is exercised, funding for MJU-64/B will combine funds from the Special Defense Acquisition Fund (42%); United Kingdom (18%); Netherlands (11%); procurement of aircraft (Air Force) funds (10%); Poland (7.6%); Switzerland (7%); procurement of ammunition (Navy and Marine Corps) funds (2%); Morocco (1%); Italy (1%); and Denmark (0.4%), while funding for MJU-66/B will combine funds from Australia (79%); the Special Defense Acquisition Fund (16%); Norway (4%); and Italy (1%). This was a fully competitive requirement, with one offer received. Naval Supply Systems Command Weapon Systems Support, Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, is the contracting activity (N00104-22-C-K077).

*Small business

Home Insurance: An Overview for First Time Homebuyers

There are countless things to consider when buying your first home. Is the home in a good neighborhood to raise kids? What’s the commute like? Can you afford it? What about ensuring your new home and its contents are adequately protected? Dissecting the ins and outs of your homeowners insurance policy might not be top of mind in the midst of closing on your first home, so we’ve broken down some important things to know.Basic coverageStandard homeowners insurance policies protect your home from damag...

There are countless things to consider when buying your first home. Is the home in a good neighborhood to raise kids? What’s the commute like? Can you afford it? What about ensuring your new home and its contents are adequately protected? Dissecting the ins and outs of your homeowners insurance policy might not be top of mind in the midst of closing on your first home, so we’ve broken down some important things to know.

Basic coverage

Standard homeowners insurance policies protect your home from damage or loss due to fire or lightning, windstorm or hail, theft, smoke damage, glass breakage, falling objects, weight of snow, ice or sleet and electrical damage up to a certain dollar amount. It also covers your personal belongings up to a certain amount.

Replacement Cost Coverage

If your home is destroyed, a standard homeowners insurance policy will cover the cost to rebuild your home and also cover the additional living expenses you incur while it is being rebuilt. Replacement Cost includes the cost of labor and construction materials, but doesn't subtract for depreciation, so it's based on today's costs. Even though it accounts for inflation, it only covers up to 100% of the coverage amount you set for your policy.

Additional Replacement Cost coverage

Some insurance companies offer Additional Replacement Cost coverage which includes the cost of labor and construction materials, with no limit, and accounts for inflation. This is the only option that guarantees you’ll be able to rebuild the same house in the same location without having to pay out-of-pocket for repairs.

Deductibles

Your deductible is the amount of money you pay on your own before your insurance kicks in. It could range from $100 to $10,000. If you choose a low deductible, you’re taking on less risk, so your premium will go up. A higher deductible means more risk for you, and your bill goes down. When deciding upon a deductible, homeowners should consider their ability to pay the out of pocket expense at the time of the loss. Higher deductibles result in lower premiums.

Liability and Medical Payments

Liability and Medical Payments Liability and medical payment coverages are automatically included with each of our home insurance options listed above. Liability coverage protects you when people, other than those who live in your home, are injured while they’re on your property.

Flooding and Earthquake

Homeowners insurance does not cover flood damage as a result of a natural occurrence like tidal surge, rainfall or even sewer back up. Flood insurance can be purchased through the National Flood Insurance Program and is required if your property is located in a flood zone. However, water damage in your home due to frozen pipes, broken appliances or an overflowing bathtub is usually covered. Property damage due to an earthquake is also not covered under a standard homeowners insurance policy. It must be added as a separate endorsement or policy and may be subject to a separate deductible. Most states offer a separate earthquake endorsement.

Umbrella Insurance

Umbrella coverage is additional liability protection that stretches over both auto and home policies to cover some risks that may exceed those limits or aren’t covered under either policy, like libel, false arrest, slander and more.

Fine Jewelry

Just like most insurance policies cover damage to your home up to a certain dollar amount; valuable, personal belongings are also only covered up to a certain dollar amount. If you have fine jewelry, expensive artwork or valuable heirlooms, you’ll want to list them separately so you can increase the protection for those high-value items.

Injuries

If your friend slips and falls on ice on your property, your home insurance policy’s medical payments typically helps cover medical claims that are filed. However, if you or another resident were to fall on that same patch of ice, your health insurance will kick in to cover those claims.

Home Business

If you run a small business out of your home, it’s important to purchase a separate insurance policy or add coverage to your current home policy to cover any business liability or equipment. Those items are typically not covered under your standard home insurance policy.

Like most other insurance policies, your home insurance has limitations to what is covered and what isn’t. Your policy can give you coverage for many different risks you face as a homeowner, but what’s protected varies depending on the policy you choose. Bottom line is take time to understand your home insurance policy thoroughly. Consult with your insurance representative to learn about the exact coverage you have. Be sure to ask questions because every state and every house and situation is different.

Reach out to one of COUNTRY Financial’s Colorado agencies in Fort Collins (970) 221-9655, North Denver (303) 940-6864 or South Denver (303) 368-5202, with questions.

Home insurance policies issued by COUNTRY Mutual Insurance Company®, Bloomington, IL.

Other items that may interest you

Give yourself extra time at Broadway and Plaza Drive in Highlands Ranch

If the intersection of Broadway and Plaza Drive is part of your daily routine, please give yourself extra time to navigate upcoming construction.On Monday, May 16, Douglas County will begin work to replace the signal and aging concrete at that intersection. Construction is expected to last into early September.This maintenance project will include the newest traffic signal technology and the replacement of the aging concrete. The lane configurations through the intersection will remain the same.Construction Detai...

If the intersection of Broadway and Plaza Drive is part of your daily routine, please give yourself extra time to navigate upcoming construction.

On Monday, May 16, Douglas County will begin work to replace the signal and aging concrete at that intersection. Construction is expected to last into early September.

This maintenance project will include the newest traffic signal technology and the replacement of the aging concrete. The lane configurations through the intersection will remain the same.

Construction Details

During construction, two through lanes will be open on northbound and southbound Broadway. Drivers on eastbound and westbound Plaza Drive will experience some detours. Some turn lanes will also be closed at various times, and the intersection will experience intermittent closures up to 15 minutes at times. Please watch for detours and give yourself extra time.

Drivers can also expect shifting traffic lanes, a tighter driving space, noise, and concrete dust. Working hours will be from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., so please slow down and watch for crews. Lane closures and detours may be in place outside of these working hours as concrete sets.

Stay updated by signing up for emails at douglas.co.us. Scroll down and click “sign up now.” Choose “Cone Zone/Road Work.” For more information on the project, visit our web page.

Most road infrastructure is expected to last about 40 years. Highlands Ranch was founded in 1981, which means the original infrastructure is nearing the end of its expected life. In fact, this signal is one of the oldest in Douglas County. That’s why Douglas County is being proactive and planning maintenance projects, like this one.

A safe and accessible multimodal transportation network is one of the Board of County Commissioner’s six core priorities. Read more about the County’s transportation initiatives online.

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