appliance repair in Golden, CO

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Appliance Repair Golden, CO

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Delivering industry-leading repair work at cost-conscious pricing is one of our top priorities. So, don't hesitate to call our office if you find yourself in a bind - even on weekends.

When you choose to have Golden's Best Appliance Repair to visit your home in an emergency, you can count on:

  • Open Communication
  • Trustworthy Advice
  • Quick Turnaround Times
  • Honest Pricingb
  • Hard Work
  • Long-Lasting Repairs for Your Appliances

Taking this approach gives us the chance to fix your appliance quickly, so you don't have to stress about what to do next. If you have a unique or older appliance that needs fixing, don't sweat it - our experienced appliance technicians can repair just about any appliance under the sun. Whether it's refrigerator repair, washer repair, stove repair, or any other kind of appliance repair, we're here to fix the problem when you're ready.

When we say we repair just about every appliance under the sun, we mean it. Here are just a few of our most popular appliance repair specialties:

Common Signs You Need Dishwasher Repair in Golden, COUnusual Cooking Times

Appliance Repair Golden, CO

Clean Dishes Are Cool to Touch After Removing: For dishes to be clean and germ-free, you need hot, soapy water for washing. The FDA recommends using water around 110 degrees Fahrenheit, which is uncomfortable for handwashing but perfect for dishwashing machines. If you find that your dishes are cold and clammy instead of hot and steamy when you remove them, your dishwasher might need a new heating coil.

Appliance Repair Golden, CO

Dishwasher Isn't Draining: You'll know quickly if your dishwasher isn't draining properly because there will be a pool of water under your machine. If you're dealing with drainage problems, it could be due to a clogged drainage system or non-functioning pump.

Appliance Repair Golden, CO

Leaky Dishwasher: As one of our most requested appliance repairer services, we help customers deal with leaky dishwashers all the time. This common problem can be caused by a damaged door gasket, leaky dishwasher tub, loose valve, or another issue.

Common Signs You Need Refrigerator Repair in Golden, CO

Appliance Repair Golden, CO

Loud Humming and Vibrating Noises: Hearing vibrating and humming sounds from your fridge is not uncommon. In fact, these noises are a normal part of your refrigerator's operation. However, they shouldn't be very noisy at all. If you hear unusually loud knocking, humming, or vibrating, you could have a problem on your hands. Whether it's a faulty compressor or a blocked condenser fan, our team will diagnose the problem and get to work fixing your fridge.

Appliance Repair Golden, CO

Spoiled Food: The whole point of putting your food in the refrigerator is so it doesn't spoil. So, if you notice your food spoiling prematurely, it's a good sign that you need appliance repair for your refrigerator. Because of the nature of these repairs, it's important to hire a licensed repair technician to find and correct the root cause of your problem.

Appliance Repair Golden, CO

Water on Floor Underneath Fridge: If you spot standing water under your refrigerator, it's a big cause for concern. Not just for the health of your appliance, but for water leaking into your home. Usually, leaks are caused by trapped condensation due to clogged pipes or hoses. You'll need an experienced refrigerator repair tech to clear blockages and ultimately solve your leaking problem.

Common Signs You Need Oven or Stove Repair in Golden, CO

Appliance Repair Golden, CO

Unusual Cooking Times: Are your grandma's time-tested recipes being burnt or undercooked? Have you had to change cooking times for your family's favorite meals? Unusual differences in cooking times are a telltale sign that your oven needs to be repaired by a professional.

Appliance Repair Golden, CO

Oven Won't CloseElectrical Problems: It might seem minor on the surface, but when your oven door doesn't close, you can't cook your food properly. Chances are you need a licensed oven repair technician to refit or replace the hinges on your oven door, so you can get back to cooking.

Appliance Repair Golden, CO

Electrical Problems: If you have an electric oven and notice that it cuts off during cooking or won't turn on at all, you might need oven repair. Like gas, electrical problems are best remedied by professionals, like those you'll find at Golden's Best Appliance Repair.

Your Best Choice for Expert Appliance Repair in Golden, CO

Whatever appliance repair issue you need solving, there is no problem too big or small for our team to handle. There's a reason why we call ourselves Golden's Best Appliance Repair: because we offer the total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Golden, we fix all major domestic and foreign brands with unbeatable deals and 100% customer satisfaction.

Customers choose our company for their appliance repairs because we provide:

  • Service to All Major Brands
  • Over 25 Years of Appliance Repair Experience
  • 7-Day and Emergency Services
  • Best Warranty in Town: 5-Year Parts and 6 Months Labor
  • Friendly, Helpful Customer Service
  • Licensed & Insured Work
  • Free Estimates
  • Mobile Service = We Come to You!

Whether you need emergency repairs for your clothes washer or need routine appliance maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations.

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Latest News in Golden, CO

Katharine Hepburn Said This Co-Star Didn't "Have a Soul"

Katharine Hepburn has more Best Actress Oscar wins than any other performer, and apparently, she was determined to keep it that way. In 1981, Hepburn starred in On Golden Pond alongside Jane Fonda. And as Fonda has explained, Hepburn was never a fan of hers. The older actor ...

Katharine Hepburn has more Best Actress Oscar wins than any other performer, and apparently, she was determined to keep it that way. In 1981, Hepburn starred in On Golden Pond alongside Jane Fonda. And as Fonda has explained, Hepburn was never a fan of hers. The older actor was candid about seeing Fonda as a threat and told someone else that she believed the Klute star "didn't have a soul."

Hepburn passed away in 2003, but Fonda has since shared some of her memories from the set of the film. Read on to see what Fonda has said about her co-star, including why she still has a lot of respect for the Hollywood legend despite her unwelcoming words.

On Golden Pond, which also co-starred Fonda's father, Henry Fonda, was a big success at the box office, as well as critically. The drama received 10 nominations at the Academy Awards and won in three categories: Best Actress for Hepburn, Best Actor for Henry, and Best Adapted Screenplay. The Oscar was Hepburn's fourth Best Actress win, earning her a record that she still posthumously holds.

The film is about a man (Henry) who has a strained relationship with his daughter (Fonda) but agrees to temporarily take care of her fiancé's young son along with his wife (Hepburn).

In a 2021 interview with Harper's Bazaar, Fonda talked about working with Hepburn on On Golden Pond. She shared that Hepburn saw her as competition despite their difference in age.

"What an interesting woman. I mean, we were not friends," Fonda said. "She was really competitive. She really thought that I was out to win more Academy Awards than she was, and when she won for On Golden Pond I called to congratulate her, and she said, 'You'll never catch me now.'"

Fonda has won two Oscars for Best Actress: one for Klute in 1972 and one for Coming Home in 1979.

Fonda also said that she found out that Hepburn spoke negatively to writer Dominick Dunne about her. "She did not like me," Fonda told Harper's Bazaar. "She once told Dominick Dunne that I didn't have a soul."

Speaking with fellow actor Marlo Thomas in 2012, Fonda said of Hepburn, "She didn't like me because I was married, because I had children. She thought actors never should have children, and I had a patch." Fonda has three children while Hepburn did not. The older actor also never remarried after a six-year marriage that began when she was 21. Fonda added with a laugh, "She preferred people who had absolutely no attachment—expect to her."

In her interview with Thomas, Fonda told the story of how she ended up doing her own dive in On Golden Pond—even though she had planned to use a stunt double—after an encounter with Hepburn.

"It all happened the first time I met her," Fonda recalled. "I came to where she lived in New York, and the first thing she said to me was, 'I don't like you.' And there were reasons why she said that. And once we got that out of the way, the next question was, 'Are you going to do the backflip yourself?' Well, following on the heels of 'I don't like you,' I was not going to tell her that 'No, I was not going to do the backflip, there was a double already lined up.' And, besides, I suddenly remembered her dive in The Philadelphia Story, so I said, 'Of course, I'm going to do the dive myself!'"

The actor rehearsed the dive for a month. "It was never a good dive, but she would hide in the bushes and watch me," Fonda said. "And when I finally did it one time—I did it better than it actually is in the movie—and she praised me and told me that I taught her to respect me, so that was real important."

Despite their personal tension, Fonda had respect for Hepburn, particularly regarding the responsibility she felt as a Hollywood legend. What the Grace and Frankie star liked best about Hepburn was that she thought it was important to teach younger actors and share her wisdom.

"She took that very seriously about teaching to younger people. She took me—I can't say under her wing, she didn't like me very much," Fonda told Thomas.

Similarly, in the Harper's Bazaar interview, she said, "What I loved about her was that she took the job of being an elder very seriously. She was intentional about teaching me and talking to me, including giving me line readings, and I found that just wonderful."

4 Precious Metals Stocks As Possible Inflation Hedges

FOR ONLY $1: You can follow full-time trader Chris Capre & get his options trades in real-time. Click Here to Get His Next Trade!Even though the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 is in effect, markets can have a way of determining whether the plan works or not. Not that it’s expected, but if the oil and natural gas markets become even more volatile than they are &...

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Even though the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 is in effect, markets can have a way of determining whether the plan works or not. Not that it’s expected, but if the oil and natural gas markets become even more volatile than they are — with Russia and Europe at odds — it’s a concern if you’re thinking about the possibilities of higher prices.

That’s probably the most obvious example of a reason to be considering an inflation hedge as part of a diversified investment plan. It doesn’t look like cryptocurrencies are making good hedges as once predicted by some. The classic go-to of precious metals might become fashionable again under the right circumstances.

For those who think along these lines, here are four exchange-traded gold and silver miners that may be worth consideration, especially when you see how far they’ve fallen — along with the price of gold and silver — since April. Are these bargains now?

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Newmont Corp.

is the big one among stocks that count in the precious metals sector. When institutions decide to buy more gold and silver miners, this is likely to be first on their lists — it already owns about 85% of the float. With an average daily volume of 8.74 million shares, it’s the kind of liquidity that big firms like.

Newmont is global: It has operations and projects in North America, South America, Africa and Australia. Earnings per share (EPS) for this year are negative by 58.1%. The past five-year EPS growth rate is 39.3%. Shareholder equity is greater than long-term debt, and the current ratio is 2.8. Newmont trades at just 1.53 times its book value. The company pays a 5.28% dividend.

That’s quite the “oversold” relative strength index (RSI), according to the price chart below:

Buenaventura Mining Co. Inc.

is a Peruvian precious metals miner — the official name is Compania de Minas Buenaventura. The company is now trading with a price-to-earnings ratio of 7 at about half its book value. Buenaventrua has been around for 68 years and became the first Latin American mining firm to be listed on the New York Stock Exchange in 1996.

This year’s earnings are up by 187% and the five-year growth rate is 19.2%. Long-term debt is greatly exceeded by shareholder equity. Average daily volume comes in at 1.6 million shares. Buenaventura pays a dividend of 1.29%.

Toronto-based Barrick Gold Corp.

has operations and projects across Canada, North America, South America and Africa. This is another one favored by large institutional investors (when they’re looking for precious metals miners) with an average daily volume of 21.49 million. Barrick trades at just over book value with a price-to-earnings ratio of 13.19. Earnings for this year are down by 13%. The five-year record is up by 15.1%. This is another miner where shareholder equity exceeds the long-term debt. The current ratio is 4. Barrick investors are paid a 2.7% dividend. is headquartered in Denver with operations in the United States, Canada, Mexico, South America and Turkey. This year’s earnings are up by 74.2%. The EPS growth rate for the past five years is 21%. Long-term debt for the company is vastly exceed by shareholder equity. With a price-to-earnings ratio of 9.77 and trading at just 79% of its book, SSR Mining could be considered a value stock. Its dividend is 2.07%.

Any investor who owns these stocks should keep a close eye on monthly consumer price index and producer price numbers as this sector reacts to those measures.

Not investment advice. For educational purposes only.

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Seafaring businesses file federal lawsuit against Golden Ray owner, salvage company

Fishers, crabbers, others claim environmental damage from capsizing, salvage has wrecked their livelihoodsFishers, crabbers and other seafaring businesses, including airboat tour guides, have filed suit in federal court against the owner of the Golden Ray and the salvage company that dismantled the ship, claiming the environmental damage from the capsizing and salvage has wrecked their livelihoods.The Korean car carrier capsized onto its ...

Fishers, crabbers, others claim environmental damage from capsizing, salvage has wrecked their livelihoods

Fishers, crabbers and other seafaring businesses, including airboat tour guides, have filed suit in federal court against the owner of the Golden Ray and the salvage company that dismantled the ship, claiming the environmental damage from the capsizing and salvage has wrecked their livelihoods.

The Korean car carrier capsized onto its side on Sept. 9, 2019, shortly after departing the Port of Brunswick. All crew members were rescued safely, but salvage experts deemed the ship itself, measuring 656 feet long, was a complete loss.

The 93-page suit, which includes maps and photos of the damage, says tens of thousands of gallons of fuel leaked into St. Simons Sound, as well as an unknown amount of oil. The Georgia Department of Natural Resources has still not begun an environmental assessment.

In addition, during the salvage of the capsized ship, there were several fires. The biggest one broke out on May 14, 2021.

It took two years and more than 3 million person-hours to complete the largest removal of the shipwreck. Even after the wreck was considered clear, the impacts lingered, according to the lawsuit by a coalition of seafaring industry workers.

The industries are suing under the Clean Water Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, and the Oil Pollution Act.

They argue that “oil and oil-based pollutants are likely to remain suspended in the water column and embedded in the sediment for the foreseeable future.”

The lawsuit goes on to say the wreck “created a condition that is harmful to the health of the sound, the surrounding rivers and marshlands, estuaries and beaches.”

The Golden Ray was carrying more than 4,200 vehicles and 300,000 gallons of fuel onboard when it capsized. That fuel leaked into the surrounding waterways and land, including the St. Simons Sound, Jekyll and Cumberland islands, and parts of St. Simons and Sea islands, as well as Mackay River and surrounding marshes.

Fletcher Sams, executive director of the Altamaha Riverkeeper conservation group, said one of the most urgent steps that the defendants haven’t taken yet is taking a full toll of the damage done by the wreck.

“I think that the public deserves to know how damaged the estuary is and what, if anything, needs to occur to fix it,” Sams said. “And what I see with these lawsuits is people that rely on the resource or having to take these kinds of measures.”

Crews recovered about 8,000 pounds of ship-related debris from shores and marsh and 9,500 pounds of non-ship-related trash. But the plaintiffs say that the message hasn’t been cleaned up yet and continues to damage the environment and cost these businesses serious revenue because neither fish nor tourists have been seen at the levels they were before the incident.

News4JAX reached out to the companies facing this lawsuit for comment but has not received a response.

It’s the second major environmental-related case brought against the Golden Ray’s operators since the wreck. In March, Glynn County filed a lawsuit in federal court against the owner of the Golden Ray, the company involved in the salvage of the Golden Ray and others, claiming significant damage to the coastal environment and damage to the county’s economy. That suit asked a federal judge to order the defendants to begin immediate cleanup and to reimburse the county for costs it has incurred doing cleanup work.

Thursday marked three years since the vessel, at more than 71,000 tons, flipped over onto its side off the coast of Georgia.

The U.S. National Transportation Safety Board reported the combined losses totaled more than $204 million. The agency concluded an officer’s error in calculating the stability of the ship loaded with more than 4,200 automobiles left its center of gravity too high, causing the vessel to capsize.

In October, the final giant chunk of the overturned ship was removed, with Cmdr. Efren Lopez with the U.S. Coast Guard saying, “We have completed the largest wreck removal in U.S. history.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Copyright 2022 by WJXT News4JAX - All rights reserved.

Golden State Warriors’ co-owner launches NFT sport prediction game

Nick Swinmurn, co-owner of the National Basketball Association (NBA) team Golden State Warriors is part of the team behind the sports non-fungible token (NFT) game Play Hellebore.Play Hellebore is the first NFT-powered play-to-earn (P2E) sports prediction game.To play the game, users must purchase a “Siber” NFT for 0.03 Ethereum (ETH, cur...

Nick Swinmurn, co-owner of the National Basketball Association (NBA) team Golden State Warriors is part of the team behind the sports non-fungible token (NFT) game Play Hellebore.

Play Hellebore is the first NFT-powered play-to-earn (P2E) sports prediction game.

To play the game, users must purchase a “Siber” NFT for 0.03 Ethereum (ETH, currently worth $45 (£39), which gives them access to the site.

They can then create leagues and play matches with other teams to win NFTs, merchandise and fan engagement experiences. Play Hellebore leagues start on 8 September 2022.

Swinmurn, who is also the owner of the online retailer Zappos, told CoinDesk “Play Hellebore isn’t meant to replace traditional fantasy sports. We expect crypto natives [to be] early adopters that know the value of digital ownership, but we are also passionate about helping to educate and onboard newcomers.”

Plans to expand in 2023

Play Hellebore plans to add hockey, basketball, golf, tennis and racing to its platform by the end of 2023.

At present, baseball and American football are the only two sports featured on the sports prediction game.

What is your sentiment on ETH/USD?

Golden State Warriors and NFTs

In April 2022, the Golden State Warriors announced they were celebrating their 2022 NBA Playoff run by announcing their second ever NFT drop.

The Golden State Warriors 2022 Playoff NFT collection adapted as the team’s Playoff run extended and offered new “utilities and benefits for NFT owners”.

Depending on the rarity of each NFT fans were given the chance to unlock prizes such as tickets for basketball games, autographed items and exclusive merchandise.

The Golden State Warriors 2022 Playoff NFT collection consists of 3,000 NFTs. The NFTs will grant fans “access to member-only benefits, exclusive Warriors' swag and white-list access to future NFT drops.”

A part of the proceeds from the NFT collection went to the Warriors Community Foundation, which has granted more than $25m (£21m) in donations to the San Francisco Bay Area’s educational equity since 2012.

The Golden State Warriors are based in San Francisco.

The 2022 NBA playoffs is the postseason tournament of the NBA’s 2021–22 season, which the Golden State Warriors won.

Further reading

Coors family to remake 5 blocks of downtown Golden with massive 10-year, $600M-plus project

One of the largest redevelopment projects in Golden’s history is being undertaken by a family closely identified with the city.CoorsTek, owned by the family that started what became Coors Brewing Co. in Golden, is going to transform its 112-year-old manufacturing plant on the north end of downtown into a mix of office, retail and residential uses. The roughly 1.3 million-square-foot project is expected to take 10-plus years to complete and will fill about five city blocks over 12.4 acres.All or parts of the site’s o...

One of the largest redevelopment projects in Golden’s history is being undertaken by a family closely identified with the city.

CoorsTek, owned by the family that started what became Coors Brewing Co. in Golden, is going to transform its 112-year-old manufacturing plant on the north end of downtown into a mix of office, retail and residential uses. The roughly 1.3 million-square-foot project is expected to take 10-plus years to complete and will fill about five city blocks over 12.4 acres.

All or parts of the site’s oldest buildings will be incorporated into the project, which includes plans for apartments, a 150-room hotel and CoorsTek’s global headquarters. Crews have boarded up the windows, fenced off the site and are disassembling structures and removing the asbestos used during decades of construction.

On a recent walk around the property, Michael Coors, one of three family members who lead CoorsTek, said among the plant’s products were pottery, semiconductor parts, armor for soldiers and military vehicles, and equipment for energy production.

The plant also made labware, spark plugs and ceramic and metal components for various industrial uses.

Adolph Coors started the Golden Brewery in 1873 with Jacob Schueler. The Coors family still owns part of Molson Coors, formed in 2005 with the merger of Canadian-based Moslon and Coors. CoorsTek is wholly owned by the family.

Adolph Coors acquired Herold China and Pottery Co., renamed the Coors Porcelain Co. and eventually rebranded CoorsTek. It has 28 manufacturing sites across the world and is involved in scientific research and development.

CoorsTek employs about 1,200 people in Colorado. The last materials produced at the original plant were shipped in June.

Repurposing the site is exciting, Coors said. “It will be part of the next 100 years of our company’s history.”

The first phase of work will be the renovation of the plant’s first structure, a 1910 brick building, to house CoorsTek’s headquarters with a potential move-in date of late 2025. The space will be from 120,000 to 150,000 square feet and might include other tenants. The headquarters will account for roughly 15% of the office space with about another 650,000 square feet for yet-to-be-identified tenants.

“Members of the family thought it was important that the most historically significant buildings be preserved and be part of the future of CoorsTek,” said Dan Cohen, president of AC Development.

The Coors family started AC Development in 2020 to redevelop the industrial site. The company will be the project’s owner and operator. Michael Coors is on the board of directors.

The Golden City Council voted unanimously in June to rezone the property. The vote followed nearly two years of design, work with the city staff and public meetings and hearings, according to AC Development

After completion of the new CoorsTek headquarters, the next phase of construction will likely involve apartments, the hotel and possibly more office space, Cohen said. Plans include 350 to 400 apartments as well as retail and services such as restaurants.

The company committed to making a portion of the apartments affordable housing and to providing at least $1.5 million for an arts district. Cohen said the company agreed to a minimum of 25 affordable housing units or 10% of the total, whichever is greater.

“Everyone is struggling to get employees and certainly making it easier for people to live near work is going to make it easier to find those employees,” Cohen added.

The development company also committed to making 40% of the property open space. A series of public plazas and other spaces, including natural areas, are planned.

Another big change is integrating the spot into the city grid. Streets that now stop at the property’s edges will be part of the traffic flow.

All the work will likely cost between $600 million and $900 million, Coors said. “It’s a substantial project.”

The project has generated interest in the business community, Coors added.

“Golden has quite a bit of tourism,” Coors said. “We see ebbs and flows of people coming through. Having a little more activity is exciting to the business community.”

“This is going to be an economic driver for Golden and also a very exciting opportunity for that part of downtown, revitalizing it and making it a valued part of the community,” said Rick Muriby, the city’s community and economic development director.

The industrial property provides an opening for new development in the city of nearly 20,000. Most of the land nestled into the foothills and along Clear Creek has been built on.

“One of the challenges in a small city like Golden is that it’s already built out,” Muriby said. “We don’t really have greenfield development any more. We have redevelopment and a limited amount of infill development, but not a lot of vacant lots.”

The city staff worked with AC Development on the CoorsTek proposal for about a year before the public hearings began. The planning commission had five meetings on the plan and in May recommended that the city council approve it.

“We took a break in the middle to have a community outreach process so residents could kind of catch up with how complex this project is and all that’s in the proposal,” Muriby said.

“We spent a lot of time communicating the community’s goals around sustainability and around historic preservation, public art and housing affordability,” Muriby said. “There was a lot they were willing to cooperate with us on.”

Golden doesn’t currently require developers to include affordable housing. Muriby said the city has finished a draft assessment of housing needs and might establish requirements and an affordable-housing fund.

Parking was one point of disagreement. In exchange for reduced on-site parking, the developer said it would encourage the use of carpooling to offices and public transit. The staff proposed requiring more parking later in case the plan didn’t work, but the city council approved the project without the fallback.

The developer will have to monitor the parking, most of which will be underground. Housing will likely be built on a parking lot next to the plant.

AC Development bought four tracts of land on the north side of the plant. Cohen said the parcels won’t be part of the first phase of work, and tenants in businesses and a nonprofit organization haven’t been asked to leave.

Tim Hancock, whose house is to the north of the property and overlooks Colorado 58, told the developer that he didn’t want to sell when he was first approached roughly two years ago. “I’m 80 years old and I was going to spend the rest of my life here.”

But Hancock said he realized he eventually would be surrounded by construction if he stayed. He bought a condo in Arvada and has moved out of the house where he had lived since 1958. Hancock feels he was treated fairly, but said he’ll miss living in Golden.

Although much of the structure of the plant where manufacturing took place continuously for more than 100 years will be torn down, physical reminders will remain. Besides keeping all or parts of four of the oldest buildings, the developer will integrate bricks, kiln parts and ceramic items into the buildings. The objects could become part of the on-site public art.

“We’ll have the whole site tell the story. That’s the goal,” Coors said. “The last several years, we’ve been removing interesting components of what was inside and setting them aside.”

The development company wants to preserve the site’s history, Cohen said. “We’re going to find a variety of ways to make sure the history of the activities that have occurred on this site and the importance of this property in the broader city are told.”

While honoring CoorsTek’s legacy, Coors and Cohen expect the company’s ongoing work to spur interest in the site.

“We’re pretty proud of the heritage and history of this company. It’s been able to really innovate and find new products that are meaningful for the world for over 100 years and it’s still going strong,” Coors said. “We’ve been supporting the energy industry for the last 100 years and as the energy transition occurs, we’re seeing new opportunities for new products.”

The energy transition will be front and center at the redeveloped site. Trains used to roll up behind the plant and dump loads of coal to fuel the activity. The new and renovated buildings will be powered by solar energy and will use all electric appliances.

“With CoorsTek as an anchor tenant,” Cohen said, ” we think it’s going to attract other innovative companies in clean energy and that other industries are going to want to gather here.”

Updated at 4:25 p.m. Aug. 26 to clarify the project’s total amount of proposed office space.

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