appliance repair in Commerce City, CO

Let's Talk!

Appliance Repair Commerce City, CO

What Clients Say About Us

Delivering industry-leading repair work at cost-conscious pricing is one of our top priorities. So, don't hesitate to call our office if you find yourself in a bind - even on weekends.

When you choose to have Commerce City's Best Appliance Repair to visit your home in an emergency, you can count on:

  • Open Communication
  • Trustworthy Advice
  • Quick Turnaround Times
  • Honest Pricingb
  • Hard Work
  • Long-Lasting Repairs for Your Appliances

Taking this approach gives us the chance to fix your appliance quickly, so you don't have to stress about what to do next. If you have a unique or older appliance that needs fixing, don't sweat it - our experienced appliance technicians can repair just about any appliance under the sun. Whether it's refrigerator repair, washer repair, stove repair, or any other kind of appliance repair, we're here to fix the problem when you're ready.

When we say we repair just about every appliance under the sun, we mean it. Here are just a few of our most popular appliance repair specialties:

Common Signs You Need Dishwasher Repair in Commerce City, COUnusual Cooking Times

Appliance Repair Commerce City, CO

Clean Dishes Are Cool to Touch After Removing: For dishes to be clean and germ-free, you need hot, soapy water for washing. The FDA recommends using water around 110 degrees Fahrenheit, which is uncomfortable for handwashing but perfect for dishwashing machines. If you find that your dishes are cold and clammy instead of hot and steamy when you remove them, your dishwasher might need a new heating coil.

Appliance Repair Commerce City, CO

Dishwasher Isn't Draining: You'll know quickly if your dishwasher isn't draining properly because there will be a pool of water under your machine. If you're dealing with drainage problems, it could be due to a clogged drainage system or non-functioning pump.

Appliance Repair Commerce City, CO

Leaky Dishwasher: As one of our most requested appliance repairer services, we help customers deal with leaky dishwashers all the time. This common problem can be caused by a damaged door gasket, leaky dishwasher tub, loose valve, or another issue.

Common Signs You Need Refrigerator Repair in Commerce City, CO

Appliance Repair Commerce City, CO

Loud Humming and Vibrating Noises: Hearing vibrating and humming sounds from your fridge is not uncommon. In fact, these noises are a normal part of your refrigerator's operation. However, they shouldn't be very noisy at all. If you hear unusually loud knocking, humming, or vibrating, you could have a problem on your hands. Whether it's a faulty compressor or a blocked condenser fan, our team will diagnose the problem and get to work fixing your fridge.

Appliance Repair Commerce City, CO

Spoiled Food: The whole point of putting your food in the refrigerator is so it doesn't spoil. So, if you notice your food spoiling prematurely, it's a good sign that you need appliance repair for your refrigerator. Because of the nature of these repairs, it's important to hire a licensed repair technician to find and correct the root cause of your problem.

Appliance Repair Commerce City, CO

Water on Floor Underneath Fridge: If you spot standing water under your refrigerator, it's a big cause for concern. Not just for the health of your appliance, but for water leaking into your home. Usually, leaks are caused by trapped condensation due to clogged pipes or hoses. You'll need an experienced refrigerator repair tech to clear blockages and ultimately solve your leaking problem.

Common Signs You Need Oven or Stove Repair in Commerce City, CO

Appliance Repair Commerce City, CO

Unusual Cooking Times: Are your grandma's time-tested recipes being burnt or undercooked? Have you had to change cooking times for your family's favorite meals? Unusual differences in cooking times are a telltale sign that your oven needs to be repaired by a professional.

Appliance Repair Commerce City, CO

Oven Won't CloseElectrical Problems: It might seem minor on the surface, but when your oven door doesn't close, you can't cook your food properly. Chances are you need a licensed oven repair technician to refit or replace the hinges on your oven door, so you can get back to cooking.

Appliance Repair Commerce City, CO

Electrical Problems: If you have an electric oven and notice that it cuts off during cooking or won't turn on at all, you might need oven repair. Like gas, electrical problems are best remedied by professionals, like those you'll find at Commerce City's Best Appliance Repair.

Your Best Choice for Expert Appliance Repair in Commerce City, CO

Whatever appliance repair issue you need solving, there is no problem too big or small for our team to handle. There's a reason why we call ourselves Commerce City's Best Appliance Repair: because we offer the total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Commerce City, we fix all major domestic and foreign brands with unbeatable deals and 100% customer satisfaction.

Customers choose our company for their appliance repairs because we provide:

  • Service to All Major Brands
  • Over 25 Years of Appliance Repair Experience
  • 7-Day and Emergency Services
  • Best Warranty in Town: 5-Year Parts and 6 Months Labor
  • Friendly, Helpful Customer Service
  • Licensed & Insured Work
  • Free Estimates
  • Mobile Service = We Come to You!

Whether you need emergency repairs for your clothes washer or need routine appliance maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations.

Physical-therapy-phone-number303-536-3873

Free Estimate

Latest News in Commerce City, CO

Colorado regulators tell Suncor to better monitor air pollution from oil refinery north of Denver

Air quality monitoring around Suncor Energy’s oil refinery in Commerce City must be stronger than what the company has proposed to better address the community’s concerns about the pollutants the facility belches into the air, state regulators say.Suncor presented late last year its plan to monitor air quality along the refinery’s 3.4-mile perimeter to comply with state law, but now Colorado’s Air Pollution Control Division says that plan is not good enough and it will require the company to do more.The ...

Air quality monitoring around Suncor Energy’s oil refinery in Commerce City must be stronger than what the company has proposed to better address the community’s concerns about the pollutants the facility belches into the air, state regulators say.

Suncor presented late last year its plan to monitor air quality along the refinery’s 3.4-mile perimeter to comply with state law, but now Colorado’s Air Pollution Control Division says that plan is not good enough and it will require the company to do more.

The tougher requirements, which go into effect next year, are the result of a series of public hearings held in the spring at which those who live near the refinery told regulators they wanted more oversight. The division, which oversees Suncor’s air permits and compliance with federal and state laws, agreed.

“We heard from the public they were interested in these changes and we agreed with them,” said Michael Ogletree, Air Pollution Control Division director. “The public was accurate in identifying that Suncor was doing the minimum they could.”

In 2021, the Colorado legislature passed a law that required Suncor and three other industrial facilities that reach a specific threshold for releasing toxins into the air to create monitoring plans around their boundaries. Three other companies — Sinclair Oil and Phillips 66 in Commerce City and Goodrich Carbon in Pueblo — soon will need to start monitoring programs, but Suncor was required to go first.

The refinery just north of Denver is the largest single source of air pollution in Colorado, and public health officials say its location in an urban area leads its pollution to disproportionately affect a low-income, minority population.

Loa Esquilin Garcia, a Suncor spokeswoman, said in an emailed statement that the company is reviewing the state’s plan and she would not be able to speak on it.

The company this year also started its own air monitoring system, deploying a machine inside a van that drives through neighborhoods around the refinery to collect air samples. That program was started after a 2020 settlement between Suncor and the state over years of air pollution violations.

A community organization, Cultivando, also runs an air monitoring program around Suncor.

Colorado law requires companies to monitor for benzene, hydrogen cyanide and hydrogen sulfide, but it also gives the Air Pollution Control Division authority to require Suncor to monitor for more pollutants. The division will do just that, Ogletree said.

State regulators will require Suncor to monitor an additional 11 toxins, including nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, toluene, ethyl benzene, xylenes and other compounds that are found in oil and gas emissions.

The state also wants Suncor to monitor emissions 24 hours per day in all directions. The company’s plan called for the installation of monitoring systems along the fenceline that would sample air in one direction for five minutes before rotating to collect samples in another direction. But that would only monitor 50% of the facility 50% of the time, Olgetree said.

The company also had excluded its corners on its list of monitoring stations, and the state said systems need to be installed at those points, too.

“Now it will be 100%” coverage, Ogletree said.

The state also wants Suncor to revise its testing for hydrogen sulfide, saying its proposed detection systems wouldn’t find low levels that still would require an emergency notification.

Finally, the state wants Suncor to boost its emergency alerting system so nearby residents and those who work in the area know when a malfunction has caused more toxins to be released. Those who are most affected by the emissions need time to respond, including evacuating if they are in danger, Ogletree said.

Overall, community residents are encouraged by the state’s tougher monitoring requirements, especially the plan to add more toxins to the monitoring list, said Ean Tafoya, state director of GreenLatinos.

“We see that to be really good,” Tafoya said. “It’s way more than the bare minimum.”

The community has been asking for data for years and now that will be provided. But, Tafoya said, people who live near Suncor will know exactly how committed the state is to more closely regulating the refinery when there is some enforcement of the rules. For too long, he said, Suncor has been allowed to exceed emissions amounts allowed under its air permits with few penalties.

“Enforcement is the next big step to see if there’s real environmental justice,” Tafoya said.

Suncor must submit its revised plan to the state by Nov. 1 and must meet the requirements specified in state law by Jan. 1, according to a news release from the Air Pollution Control Division. Deadlines for meeting other requirements are in April and July.

The division plans to hold at least two community meetings this fall to share updates on the monitoring requirements.

Join the Conversation

We invite you to use our commenting platform to engage in insightful conversations about issues in our community. We reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable to us, and to disclose any information necessary to satisfy the law, regulation, or government request. We might permanently block any user who abuses these conditions. As of June 15, 2022, comments on DenverPost.com are powered by Viafoura, and you may need to log in again to begin commenting. Read more about our new commenting system here. If you need help or are having issues with your commenting account, please email us at memberservices@denverpost.com.

Claiming students are already harmed, Adams 14 seeks to block reorganization

State efforts to reorganize the Adams 14 school district after years of low performance have already hurt students, including causing the district to lose out on contracts with international teachers who could have served the community’s many Spanish-speaking students.That’s one argument attorneys for the Adams 14 school district made in a two-day court hearing in Denver last week as they seek to block Colorado’s first major intervention into a low-performing school district.Attorneys representing the Colorado...

State efforts to reorganize the Adams 14 school district after years of low performance have already hurt students, including causing the district to lose out on contracts with international teachers who could have served the community’s many Spanish-speaking students.

That’s one argument attorneys for the Adams 14 school district made in a two-day court hearing in Denver last week as they seek to block Colorado’s first major intervention into a low-performing school district.

Attorneys representing the Colorado Department of Education and the State Board of Education countered that what’s really hurting students is more than a decade of poor education in the school district serving parts of Commerce City. Students will suffer more if state intervention is further delayed, they said.

“The children of Adams 14 have been waiting for the turnaround work to start in earnest for far too long,” a state attorney said. “Every week makes a difference.”

But the judge interrupted the state attorney’s argument to question if the public interest would actually be harmed by proceeding with reorganization while a lawsuit is pending.

“There’s just a lot of ifs. Talk about uncertainty to children and the community,” said Denver District Judge Shelley I. Gilman. “How does that affect the child? Isn’t there something that makes sense about waiting until the court resolves these issues before taking actions that can’t later be reversed?”

Gilman has two months to decide if a state reorganization order should proceed or if she’ll grant Adams 14’s request to block the order while the lawsuit plays out.

Adams 14 is challenging both the state reorganization order, which could lead to school closures or the loss of control to neighboring districts, and the entire state accountability system that allows this type of intervention. The state wants the lawsuit dismissed.

The State Board of Education removed Adams 14’s accreditation and ordered that the district be reorganized in May. The district was previously under external management after more than eight years of persistently low test scores. But before the external manager completed the four years it was supposed to oversee Adams 14, the local school board voted to fire the external manager after a new superintendent Karla Loria raised questions about mismanagement.

State Education Commissioner Katy Anthes hasn’t formally started the reorganization process, saying in testimony that she was waiting for the outcome of these legal motions. Adams 14 students returned to class on Aug. 9.

Joe Salazar, the attorney for Adams 14, described seven ways he claims the district and the larger community are already being harmed by the State Board’s order.

Students and staff have left the district out of fear that schools will shut down. The district’s bond rating has been lowered twice since the order, meaning future bond requests may end up costing the district a lot more in higher interest payments. Leaders of Adams 14 and neighboring districts have spent hours discussing the state’s orders, reassuring families, and thinking about how to prepare for all the potential impacts.

The state pointed out that the district has dealt with declining enrollment and high staff turnover for several years. Current debt payments are fixed and not at risk of costing more, the state also argued.

Loria, the superintendent, described how the district is missing at least 16 bilingual teachers it expected to hire for this school year. The district had signed a contract in the spring with a company called IAG that would find teachers from other countries and take care of the paperwork and visas necessary for the teachers to legally work in the U.S..

But the sponsor the company had secured for the teacher’s visas backed out after learning that Adams 14 had lost its accreditation. Commissioner Anthes helped the district when it was attempting to reassure a new sponsor that Adams 14 is still able to educate students in Colorado, despite its loss of accreditation.

Loria testified that Anthes apologized for the ordeal as she tried to help, and said Anthes described it as an “unintended consequence.”

Two weeks into the start of the school year, an estimated 400 students who would have been taught by the international teachers have substitute teachers, and it’s unclear if the bilingual teachers will eventually come.

Loria also testified that one of the potential sponsors was willing to continue to help the teachers if they worked at only one of the district’s schools. But those stipulations essentially remove the district’s local control to decide where teachers are needed, Loria said.

The state’s attorneys tried to argue that the fact that the second sponsor was willing to place teachers at one school meant that the criteria was not about the loss of accreditation, since that affected all the district’s schools in the same way. The judge questioned that argument, since the court didn’t hear testimony about the sponsor’s reasoning for its decision. The judge also pointed out that the problem may be more than just a delay.

“There was a willingness before. Now it hasn’t happened,” Judge Gilman said. “I’m not sure it’s just a delay. There’s no certainty. Folks are making phone calls and sending letters and trying their best, but there’s no assurance.”

In another case of a possible unexpected harm from the loss of accreditation, the district called as a witness La Crea Dixon, an alumna and district paraprofessional who enrolled this summer at Colorado Christian University, planning to study to become a special education teacher.

Dixon planned to pay with a TEACH grant, funded by the federal government. But after weeks of getting the runaround, she said an administrator at the university told her the grant had been denied because Adams 14 was not an accredited school district.

The state attorneys said they believe there is some confusion as to where that information came from, since they are not aware of any rules that would require the district to be accredited.

When questioned, Anthes said she is still looking at the implications of the State Board order and hasn’t decided if she will kick off the reorganization process if the judge doesn’t pause the order. But she also said she does not have the authority to reverse the State Board’s orders.

Reorganization will require Adams 14 and neighboring districts to appoint a committee tasked with coming up with a plan for reimagining district boundaries. Anthes also said in court that the group could decide it’s best to keep everything the same.

State attorneys said that if the court allows the state’s orders to move forward, it’s still unlikely the group would finalize any changes before the lawsuit is resolved.

Yesenia Robles is a reporter for Chalkbeat Colorado covering K-12 school districts and multilingual education. Contact Yesenia at yrobles@chalkbeat.org.

‘Caps fall to Rapids, return home for three straight at BC Place

COMMERCE CITY, CO – Vancouver Whitecaps FC fell to a 3-1 loss against Western Conference side Colorado Rapids at Dick’s Sporting Goods Park this Saturday night.The first half started quickly for the ‘Caps, as defender Ranko Veselinović sent a ball deep into the final third. Brian White followed up with some footwork inside the box and his close range finish would open the scoring for Vancouver in the 9th minute.With the match progressing, Rapids midfielder Felipe Gutiérrez delivered a ...

COMMERCE CITY, CO – Vancouver Whitecaps FC fell to a 3-1 loss against Western Conference side Colorado Rapids at Dick’s Sporting Goods Park this Saturday night.

The first half started quickly for the ‘Caps, as defender Ranko Veselinović sent a ball deep into the final third. Brian White followed up with some footwork inside the box and his close range finish would open the scoring for Vancouver in the 9th minute.

With the match progressing, Rapids midfielder Felipe Gutiérrez delivered a cross in from the left side of the field, which connected to Gyasi Zardes inside the area. The forward’s strike levelled the game in the 21st minute.

Moments later, Colorado were given a questionable penalty, midfielder Diego Rubio converted from the spot to give his squad a 2-1 advantage in the 33rd minute of the match.

The home side would cushion their lead later on in the second half. Jonathan Lewis dribbled inside the area and found the top corner of the net in the 75th minute.

The Blue & White return home at BC Place for a final three game home stand, as they first host LA Galaxy next Wednesday, September 14, with kickoff set to be at 7 p.m. PT. Tickets for select three or more home matches are available via Flex Pass whitecapsfc.com/flexpass.

MATCH DETAILS VWFC GE Appliances Player of Quality: Pedro Vite Attendance: 14,036 Referee: Kevin Stott

Scoring Summary 9’ – VAN – Brian White (Ranko Veselinović) 21’ – COL – Gyasi Zardes (Felipe Gutiérrez, Jonathan Lewis) 33’ – COL – Diego Rubio (penalty kick) 75’ – COL – Jonathan Lewis (Jack Price)

Statistics Possession: COL 47.5% – VAN 52.5% Shots: COL 24 – VAN 15 Shots on Goal: COL 5 – VAN 4 Saves: COL 3 – VAN 2 Fouls: COL 10 – VAN 15 Offsides: COL 1 – VAN 2 Corners: COL 7 – VAN 4

Cautions 32’ – VAN – Ranko Veselinović 52’ – VAN – Alessandro Schöpf

Colorado Rapids 22.William Yarbrough; 2.Keegan Rosenberry, 6.Lalas Abubakar (24.Gustavo Vallecilla 78’), 4.Danny Wilson, 66.Lucas Esteves; 21.Bryan Acosta, 13.Felipe Gutiérrez (19.Jack Price 68’); 15.Sam Nicholson (12.Michael Barrios 67’), 11.Diego Rubio © (77.Darren Yapi 84’),7.Jonathan Lewis (8.Max 78’); 29.Gyasi Zardes

Substitutes not used 1.Clint Irwin, 31.Anthony Markanich, 32.Collen Warner, 97.Ralph Priso

Vancouver Whitecaps FC 55.Cody Cropper; 23.Javain Brown, 4.Ranko Veselinović (87.Tosaint Ricketts 82’), 6.Tristan Blackmon, 2.Marcus Godinho (14.Luís Martins 63’); 18.Alessandro Schöpf (11.Cristian Dájome 64’), 20.Andrés Cubas, 31.Russell Teibert © (17.Leonard Owusu 73’); 19.Julian Gressel (27.Ryan Raposo 82’), 45.Pedro Vite; 24.Brian White

Substitutes not used 1.Thomas Hasal, 26.Florian Jungwirth, 28.Jake Nerwinski, 29.Simon Becher

Suncor gets long overdue air permit after original plan was rejected

A long overdue air permit for the Suncor refinery in Commerce City will be approved by the Environmental Protection Agency, bringing the facility closer to being in compliance with federal regulations.The state will issue the permit on Sept. 1, Michael Ogletree, the state’s Air Pollution Control division director, said Thursday during a meeting with the Colorado Air Quality Control Commission. A spokesman for the EPA’s Region 8 office confirmed the approval.The EPA in March rejected the Plant 2 application submitted...

A long overdue air permit for the Suncor refinery in Commerce City will be approved by the Environmental Protection Agency, bringing the facility closer to being in compliance with federal regulations.

The state will issue the permit on Sept. 1, Michael Ogletree, the state’s Air Pollution Control division director, said Thursday during a meeting with the Colorado Air Quality Control Commission. A spokesman for the EPA’s Region 8 office confirmed the approval.

The EPA in March rejected the Plant 2 application submitted by CDPHE and asked the state to reconsider its plan to monitor three sites where Suncor uses flares to burn off excess chemicals. Originally, the Air Pollution Control Division wanted to exempt those flaring sources from regular monitoring but the EPA wanted the state to do more analysis and justify its reasoning behind those exemptions.

In its revised application, the state developed specific monitoring plans for flares at the Plant 2 refinery, a truck loading dock and a railcar loading site, Richard Mylott, an EPA spokesman said.

“These plans clarify how existing monitoring at these emissions points will be used to ensure compliance with regulations,” he said.

Suncor operates under two federal Title IV air permits and both expired years ago. Those air-quality permits are supposed to be renewed every five years, but the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, which must approve applications before advancing them to the EPA, failed to act. The refinery is allowed to continue operations under the terms of its old permits until new ones are approved.

The permit for Suncor’s Plant 2, which was approved earlier this month, was issued in 2006 and revised in 2009. Suncor submitted a renewal application for Plant 2 in 2010 to the Colorado Department of Health and Environment. Plant 2 refines oil into gasoline and other fuels.

Suncor’s second air permit, which covers its Plants 1 and 3, expired four years ago and is under review by the EPA. The plant has two air permits because one was held by a company that previously owned parts of the refinery. Plant 1 refines oil into gasoline while Plant 3 manufactures asphalt.

In its March objection on the Plant 2 permit, the EPA also expressed significant concern about the refinery’s environmental impact on people who live and work within a three-mile radius of the plant, and KC Becker, administrator of the EPA’s Region 8, suggested multiple steps the state can take to improve communication with the community when it comes to permitting for the plant and reporting on the pollution that comes from it.

The state has assured Becker and the EPA that it is committed to working with the community about their concerns. In a letter notifying Colorado officials that the Plant 2 permit would be approved, Becker asked CDPHE to post a written response about its plans on how to address the community’s concerns on its website within 90 days.

Suncor declined to comment on the permit revisions other than to confirm it will be effective on Sept. 1.

The public has until Oct. 11 to file a petition to appeal the permit’s approval.

Phish Play “one long ass set” for Night Two at Dick’s Sporting Goods Park After Rain Delay

Last night a passing rain storm forced Phish to postpone the start of the second concert of their four-night Labor Day run at Dick’s Sporting Goods Park in Commerce City, Colo. The inclement weather forced a partial evacuation of the venue, and the Vermont quartet got things started around when the second set was expected to begin.After the cloudburst, the crew arrange the set as rapidly and efficiently as possible as fans returned to their spots with tarps, rain gear and seats. Phish took to social media to share an update that...

Last night a passing rain storm forced Phish to postpone the start of the second concert of their four-night Labor Day run at Dick’s Sporting Goods Park in Commerce City, Colo. The inclement weather forced a partial evacuation of the venue, and the Vermont quartet got things started around when the second set was expected to begin.

After the cloudburst, the crew arrange the set as rapidly and efficiently as possible as fans returned to their spots with tarps, rain gear and seats. Phish took to social media to share an update that read, “Door have re-opened @DSGpark and the show will begin as soon as we possibly can. There will be no set break tonight, just one long-ass set. Thanks for your understanding.” The last time Phish were forced to make a call of this nature was on Aug. 4 during a show at Pine Knob in Michigan.

Following the delay, Phish kicked the show off just a minute after 10 p.m. with “Carini,” effectively letting lose much pent-up energy after the wait. During the track, guitarist Trey Anastasio kept things jovial by changing by playing around with the lyrics “I saw you with Carini and that naked dude” and added, “at least he had some boots” as a nod to a streaker who rushed the field during the delay with nothing but boots on. They then moved into “You Enjoy Myself” and kept the jam flowing with a paring of “Ghost,” which saw the band fully in peak improvisational form, and “Julius.”

They continued the one-set show with “Reba,” which was spiced up with an opening sequence followed by a thematic section. Phish then performed “Tube,” which was chock-full of freeboard fireworks Anastasio had stored up from the impeded evening. They continued the jam of “Tweezer,” followed by “What’s The Use” as the clock passed 11:30 p.m.–the time fans exited the venue the night before. During the song, Lighting Director Chris Kuroda dim the lights over the stadium, offering a calm not dissimilar to the moments before the storm over the cinematic instrumental. The storm arrived in the form of “Weekapaug Groove,” catching fans a little off guard as “Mike’s Song” did not precede it and instead flowed into “No Men In Man’s Land” before finding its way back into “Weekapaug Groove.”

Phish closed out the non-stop jam with a cover of David Bowie’s “Moonage Daydream” and then set closer “Chalk Dust Torture.” Ending the “one long ass set” just before midnight. They returned of an encore of “Pebbles And Marbles” and “Tweezer Reprise,” treating fans to 15 more minutes of fun. Phish will play again at Dick’s Sporting Goods Park in Commerce City, Colo. tonight and as of this writing, no rain is expected.

Phish Dick’s Sporting Goods Park – Commerce City, Colo.Sept. 2, 2022

Set I: Carini[1] > You Enjoy Myself -> Ghost > Julius, Reba, Tube > Tweezer > What’s the Use? > Weekapaug Groove -> No Men In No Man’s Land > Weekapaug Groove > Moonage Daydream > Chalk Dust Torture

Enc.: Pebbles and Marbles, Tweezer Reprise

[1] Lyrics changed to “at least he had some boots.”

This show started late and consisted of only one set due to a lengthy delay following a thunderstorm. Carini’s lyrics were changed to “at least he had some boots” in reference to a streaker who ran out onto the field during the weather delay wearing only a pair of boots. Trey teased Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now in Carini and Streets of Cairo during Tweezer.via phish.net

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.