appliance repair in Aurora, CO

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Appliance Repair Aurora, CO

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Delivering industry-leading repair work at cost-conscious pricing is one of our top priorities. So, don't hesitate to call our office if you find yourself in a bind - even on weekends.

When you choose to have Aurora's Best Appliance Repair to visit your home in an emergency, you can count on:

  • Open Communication
  • Trustworthy Advice
  • Quick Turnaround Times
  • Honest Pricingb
  • Hard Work
  • Long-Lasting Repairs for Your Appliances

Taking this approach gives us the chance to fix your appliance quickly, so you don't have to stress about what to do next. If you have a unique or older appliance that needs fixing, don't sweat it - our experienced appliance technicians can repair just about any appliance under the sun. Whether it's refrigerator repair, washer repair, stove repair, or any other kind of appliance repair, we're here to fix the problem when you're ready.

When we say we repair just about every appliance under the sun, we mean it. Here are just a few of our most popular appliance repair specialties:

Common Signs You Need Dishwasher Repair in Aurora, COUnusual Cooking Times

Appliance Repair Aurora, CO

Clean Dishes Are Cool to Touch After Removing: For dishes to be clean and germ-free, you need hot, soapy water for washing. The FDA recommends using water around 110 degrees Fahrenheit, which is uncomfortable for handwashing but perfect for dishwashing machines. If you find that your dishes are cold and clammy instead of hot and steamy when you remove them, your dishwasher might need a new heating coil.

Appliance Repair Aurora, CO

Dishwasher Isn't Draining: You'll know quickly if your dishwasher isn't draining properly because there will be a pool of water under your machine. If you're dealing with drainage problems, it could be due to a clogged drainage system or non-functioning pump.

Appliance Repair Aurora, CO

Leaky Dishwasher: As one of our most requested appliance repairer services, we help customers deal with leaky dishwashers all the time. This common problem can be caused by a damaged door gasket, leaky dishwasher tub, loose valve, or another issue.

Common Signs You Need Refrigerator Repair in Aurora, CO

Appliance Repair Aurora, CO

Loud Humming and Vibrating Noises: Hearing vibrating and humming sounds from your fridge is not uncommon. In fact, these noises are a normal part of your refrigerator's operation. However, they shouldn't be very noisy at all. If you hear unusually loud knocking, humming, or vibrating, you could have a problem on your hands. Whether it's a faulty compressor or a blocked condenser fan, our team will diagnose the problem and get to work fixing your fridge.

Appliance Repair Aurora, CO

Spoiled Food: The whole point of putting your food in the refrigerator is so it doesn't spoil. So, if you notice your food spoiling prematurely, it's a good sign that you need appliance repair for your refrigerator. Because of the nature of these repairs, it's important to hire a licensed repair technician to find and correct the root cause of your problem.

Appliance Repair Aurora, CO

Water on Floor Underneath Fridge: If you spot standing water under your refrigerator, it's a big cause for concern. Not just for the health of your appliance, but for water leaking into your home. Usually, leaks are caused by trapped condensation due to clogged pipes or hoses. You'll need an experienced refrigerator repair tech to clear blockages and ultimately solve your leaking problem.

Common Signs You Need Oven or Stove Repair in Aurora, CO

Appliance Repair Aurora, CO

Unusual Cooking Times: Are your grandma's time-tested recipes being burnt or undercooked? Have you had to change cooking times for your family's favorite meals? Unusual differences in cooking times are a telltale sign that your oven needs to be repaired by a professional.

Appliance Repair Aurora, CO

Oven Won't CloseElectrical Problems: It might seem minor on the surface, but when your oven door doesn't close, you can't cook your food properly. Chances are you need a licensed oven repair technician to refit or replace the hinges on your oven door, so you can get back to cooking.

Appliance Repair Aurora, CO

Electrical Problems: If you have an electric oven and notice that it cuts off during cooking or won't turn on at all, you might need oven repair. Like gas, electrical problems are best remedied by professionals, like those you'll find at Aurora's Best Appliance Repair.

Your Best Choice for Expert Appliance Repair in Aurora, CO

Whatever appliance repair issue you need solving, there is no problem too big or small for our team to handle. There's a reason why we call ourselves Aurora's Best Appliance Repair: because we offer the total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Aurora, we fix all major domestic and foreign brands with unbeatable deals and 100% customer satisfaction.

Customers choose our company for their appliance repairs because we provide:

  • Service to All Major Brands
  • Over 25 Years of Appliance Repair Experience
  • 7-Day and Emergency Services
  • Best Warranty in Town: 5-Year Parts and 6 Months Labor
  • Friendly, Helpful Customer Service
  • Licensed & Insured Work
  • Free Estimates
  • Mobile Service = We Come to You!

Whether you need emergency repairs for your clothes washer or need routine appliance maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations.

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Latest News in Aurora, CO

Three injured in explosion at Aurora apartment complex; hundreds of residents displaced

Updated at 3:19 p.m.Three people were injured in an explosion at the Parkside Collective apartment complex near Aurora's city center.Aurora Fire Rescue crews were dispatched to reports of smoke on the 14000 block of East Alameda. After arriving, an explosion occurred on the western side of the building, according to Aurora Fire Rescue, forcing the entire complex to be evacuated.Three were injured in the explosion. Two were transported to UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital and one was taken...

Updated at 3:19 p.m.

Three people were injured in an explosion at the Parkside Collective apartment complex near Aurora's city center.

Aurora Fire Rescue crews were dispatched to reports of smoke on the 14000 block of East Alameda. After arriving, an explosion occurred on the western side of the building, according to Aurora Fire Rescue, forcing the entire complex to be evacuated.

Three were injured in the explosion. Two were transported to UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital and one was taken to Medical Center of Aurora. No details on severity of injuries have been shared publicly.

Fire Rescue said on Twitter that 300 to 400 residents have been displaced as a result of the explosion and will be moved to a nearby shelter.

Aurora Fire has not said what the structural status of the building is and that it was working with the Red Cross and the building's property management to help displaced residents. Aurora Fire did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

At around 9:30 a.m., building resident Emmanuel Rosado said the building's fire alarm system activated. He evacuated the building and saw neighbors running outside and away from the building.

"When we got out, we saw smoke coming from the front of the building, and a few minutes after that, we saw the explosion," Rosado said, adding that he felt shocked from what he had just witnessed.

"They are saying that (for) at least 36 hours, we are going to be without a place to stay or that nobody is going to be entering the building," Rosado said. He said that residents have been told to go to Gateway High School in Aurora for temporary shelter.

"I don't know what to do," Rosado said. "We just moved here in November. We are lucky that we have friends, but other than that, we don't have any family that we can stay with."

Matt Lynn, a Parkside Collective resident whose fifth floor sits on the eastern side of the building, was drinking coffee and reading the news when he had to evacuate. He said he didn’t hear the explosion.

“When I got downstairs I noticed that there was a pretty significant emergency response on the opposite side of the building,” Lynn said. “So, I walked around and that's when I saw that there was a large hole in the side of the building and someone on the ground being treated for injuries to his face.”

Lynn had someone pick him up because he felt residents wouldn’t be allowed in the building for a while and that property management hasn’t told residents when they can return to their apartments.

“It's my understanding that (the) Red Cross has been activated to start working with people which leads me to believe that people may be displaced for some time,” Lynn said. “But, it would certainly be nice to hear from the property management as far as what we can expect in terms of when we can access our things and potentially get back in.”

Parkside Collective management could not immediately be reached for comment.

Denverite photographer and reporter Kevin Beaty contributed to this report.

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Self-driving tech firm Aurora mulls sale to Apple or Microsoft - Bloomberg News

A Peterbilt 579 truck equipped with Aurora's self-driving system is seen at the company's terminal in Palmer, south of Dallas, Texas, U.S. September 23, 2021. Picture taken September 23, 2021. REUTERS/Tina BellonSept 2 (Reuters) - Aurora Innovation Inc (AUR.O) Chief Executive Chris Urmson recently outlined several options for the self-driving tech firm to combat challenging market conditions, including a possible sale to Apple Inc ...

A Peterbilt 579 truck equipped with Aurora's self-driving system is seen at the company's terminal in Palmer, south of Dallas, Texas, U.S. September 23, 2021. Picture taken September 23, 2021. REUTERS/Tina Bellon

Sept 2 (Reuters) - Aurora Innovation Inc (AUR.O) Chief Executive Chris Urmson recently outlined several options for the self-driving tech firm to combat challenging market conditions, including a possible sale to Apple Inc (AAPL.O) or Microsoft Corp (MSFT.O), Bloomberg News reported on Friday.

Many electric-vehicle and self-driving startups that had raised cash easily through IPOs and mergers with blank-check firms during the market boom are now scrambling to launch vehicles and burning cash rapidly amid a bleak economy and supply-chain snarls.

Reuters reported in 2020 that Apple was moving forward with its self-driving car technology and was targeting 2024 to produce a passenger vehicle that could include its own breakthrough battery technology.

Microsoft, on the other hand, has invested in San Francisco-based self-driving car maker Cruise, which is valued at $30 billion and counts General Motors Co (GM.N) as a majority stakeholder.

Urmson, who co-founded Aurora after running Google owner Alphabet Inc's (GOOGL.O) self-driving car project, also floated measures including cost cuts, taking the company private and spinning off or selling assets, the report said, citing an internal memo. (https://bloom.bg/3ReFDgP)

Aurora declined to comment.

Shares of the company closed 15% higher on Friday, but have lost nearly 80% this year, in a sign of its struggles since going public late last year with a blank-check firm. It has a market cap of about $2.4 billion.

Last month, Aurora said it would delay the delivery of its scalable autonomous freight trucks by a year to the first half of 2024, citing supply constraints.

Other options Urmson suggested in the memo were to buy companies in the sector with $150 million to $300 million of cash, and to freeze hiring and lay off employees, the Bloomberg report said.

Aurora Payments Acquires One Payment

TEMPE, Ariz.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Aurora Payments, LLC is thrilled to announce the acquisition of One Payment, a Florida-based fintech payment company. Co-founded by Luis Requejo and Jorge Calzadilla, One Payment boasts over 6,000 merchants in its portfolio with particular emphasis on minority-owned small and medium sized businesses.“The incredible year-over-year growth that One Payment has enjoyed has our team ecstatic about this acquisition&rd...

TEMPE, Ariz.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Aurora Payments, LLC is thrilled to announce the acquisition of One Payment, a Florida-based fintech payment company. Co-founded by Luis Requejo and Jorge Calzadilla, One Payment boasts over 6,000 merchants in its portfolio with particular emphasis on minority-owned small and medium sized businesses.

“The incredible year-over-year growth that One Payment has enjoyed has our team ecstatic about this acquisition”

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With over $1 billion of volume processed annually, One Payment adds immediate scale to the Aurora platform through its acquisition. With One Payment’s East Coast presence and extraordinary success selling into a traditionally difficult-to-penetrate market, the transaction will diversify Aurora’s distribution channels that expand its go-to-market capabilities.

“The incredible year-over-year growth that One Payment has enjoyed has our team ecstatic about this acquisition,” said Aurora Payments CEO Brian Goudie. “One Payment adds significant value to Aurora with its roots on the East coast and accelerates our diversified go-to-market strategy”.

Founded in 2009, One Payment specializes in payment technology and processing for quick service restaurants, retailers, and service industries amongst others. With its acquisition, they will be able to expand their distribution by leveraging Aurora’s full-service payment ecosystem and proprietary technology.

“Over the past 14 years working in the payments space, I have met few transformative people like Brian Goudie who can shape the outlook of an organization and be a positive influence for good. Since 2016, Brian has been instrumental in our success, and he is the visionary we want to help propel One Payment through the next stage of our company’s growth. One Payment is proud to “Rise with Aurora”, as we pave a new path for our business, our employees, and our merchants,” said Luis Requejo co-founder of One Payment.

About Aurora Payments

Aurora Payments is a payment technology company headquartered in Tempe, AZ and Las Vegas, NV specializing in integrated solutions for small to medium sized businesses. With the acquisition of One Payment, Aurora has over 27,000 merchants in its portfolio processing $12B in annual volume. To learn more about Aurora Payments, visit https://risewithaurora.com. For media inquiries contact Jim Luff, Corporate Communications Manager at jim.luff@risewithaurora.com.

Contacts

Jim Luff, Corporate Communications Manager, Aurora Payments (805) 910-1445 Jim.luff@risewithaurora.com

Aurora Council rejects Native American land acknowledgment: ‘This is God’s country.’

AURORA | Conservative lawmakers on Monday rejected the idea of introducing city events with an acknowledgment that Aurora was established on former Native American lands, invoking God and gripes with the language of the statement.While Councilmember Crystal Murillo said the statement would “show a sign of respect to our indigenous community,” Councilmember Danielle Jurinsky said she wouldn’t support a land acknowledgment unless the group would “also acknowledge that this is actually God’s country.&...

AURORA | Conservative lawmakers on Monday rejected the idea of introducing city events with an acknowledgment that Aurora was established on former Native American lands, invoking God and gripes with the language of the statement.

While Councilmember Crystal Murillo said the statement would “show a sign of respect to our indigenous community,” Councilmember Danielle Jurinsky said she wouldn’t support a land acknowledgment unless the group would “also acknowledge that this is actually God’s country.”

“That’s the only way I’m going to in any way, shape or form be for this,” Jurinsky said.

She also questioned staffers about the size of the city’s three-person Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion.

“I am adamantly against this, and if we have an entire department working on things like this, like I said, unless we’re going to acknowledge that this is God’s country, I can’t even believe this is coming to City Council tonight,” she said.

Land acknowledgments have been adopted by cities across Colorado and the U.S. as a way of recognizing the unique relationship between indigenous Americans and the lands they inhabited before the arrival of European settlers.

Acknowledging the historical relationship between tribes such as the Arapaho and the lands they once controlled may encourage members of the public to research Colorado’s colonial past, said Lee Spoonhunter, a member and former chairman of the Northern Arapaho Business Council.

“I welcome it. The land of Colorado — all of the way from Lamar, to Denver, to Estes Park and Fort Collins — that’s our ancestral homeland,” Spoonhunter told The Sentinel on Monday. “I truly believe that more education and awareness of how we lived in those homelands helps everyone understand how far we’ve come in America’s history.”

But land acknowledgments have also been criticized as performative, doing little on their own to right the wrongs done to native communities. Others, including some Aurora council members, have described the statements as potentially inflammatory.

Angel McKinley-Paige — manager of Aurora’s Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion — brought Aurora’s proposed land acknowledgment to a council policy committee in June, where Juan Marcano and Ruben Medina voiced their support.

McKinley-Paige said at the time that the statement was drafted by her office, the Library and Cultural Services Department, Aurora History Museum and indigenous groups as “a really great way to ensure equity:”

The City of Aurora acknowledges that we gather on the territories and ancestral homelands of the Cheyenne, Ute, Arapaho and Lakota peoples, past and present. We also recognize the 48 contemporary tribal nations that are historically tied to the lands that make up the State of Colorado. Indigenous people have remained committed to the stewardship of this land over many centuries.

As these words of acknowledgment are spoken and heard, the ties that these nations have to their traditional homelands and to their vital place in the ecosystem are renewed and reaffirmed, and we are called to be better stewards of the land we inhabit as we continue to work to meet the needs of our entire community.

The statement would be read at the start of select council meetings and at major city events. But on Monday, a majority of council members said they opposed the item moving out of study session, meaning it will not be brought to a regular meeting for a vote automatically and is likely to fail if a council member pushes for a vote regardless.

Councilmembers Francoise Bergan and Angela Lawson both expressed discomfort with the language of the acknowledgment . Bergan said she thought the description of land as “stolen” from Native Americans was divisive, though the word “stolen” did not appear in the final text of the acknowledgment .

Lawson also said she did not understand why the city would reflect on the conquest of Native American land in particular rather than conquest in general.

“Land has been conquered from all racial groups, and that’s where I’m struggling with this,” Lawson said. She did not detail which land or groups she referred to. “It seems like this could be kind of divisive in a way.”

Sara Valencich of the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion said the acknowledgment was meant to specifically recognize the groups that once called the area of Aurora home, and that the statement was “our way of simply acknowledging that the land that we live and work on was originally stewarded by individuals centuries and centuries ago.”

“Centuries and centuries ago, that’s God,” Jurinsky replied.

Councilmember Alison Coombs criticized Jurinsky for her remarks, saying what she suggested adding to the acknowledgment would infringe on the separation of church and state. She and Marcano, Medina and Murillo all said they supported introducing the acknowledgment .

Medina said he participates in an international meeting twice a month with attendees from Australia, England and Germany who routinely acknowledge the indigenous history of their countries.

“It’s just respecting the past,” Medina said. “It’s not specific to the United States. It’s something that’s going on worldwide.”

Ordinance restricting grass in new Aurora developments approved

AURORA, Colo. — The Aurora City Council unanimously approved an ordinance Monday night limiting the use of cool weather turf in new developments and golf courses.The ten-member council voted to approve the use of turf and ornamental water features ordinance. It is expected to take effect on Oct. 1, 30 days after...

AURORA, Colo. — The Aurora City Council unanimously approved an ordinance Monday night limiting the use of cool weather turf in new developments and golf courses.

The ten-member council voted to approve the use of turf and ornamental water features ordinance. It is expected to take effect on Oct. 1, 30 days after the second reading, according to a city spokesperson.

Turf means any cool-season species, variety or blend, including but not limited to Kentucky bluegrass and Fescue, according to the city. In general, it would include those with an annual irrigation water requirement greater than about 9.3 gallons per square foot

> Video above: Arapahoe County replacing field of Kentucky Bluegrass with native grasses.

The ordinance prohibits turf in common areas, medians, curbside landscape and front yards. Backyard turf is restricted to 45% of the area, or 500 square feet, whichever is smaller.

An exception was added Monday night allowing for turf in all residential front yards where backyard size prohibits the instillation of turf to the lesser of 45% or 500 square feet.

The ordinance also prohibits turf for aesthetic purposes only, but allows it in new developments "in active or programmed recreation areas."

Those are defined as an area which primary function is as a sports field. However, it can also accommodate secondary functions including but not limited to non-organized sporting events, cultural activities and organized social gatherings.

Also added Monday night was a new section requiring the city to study the following impacts three years after the effective date of the ordinance:

The results of that study are to be presented to the city council within 27 months of the ordinance taking effect.

According to the city, Aurora averages just 15 inches of precipitation each year, and said that cool weather turf typically requires "substantial watering" to survive.

Public Relations Manager for Aurora Water Greg Baker said the city uses about 16-18 billion gallons of water per year. About 50% of that water is for outdoor use, which cannot be treated and reused.

> The full approved agenda item is below:

Janet Oravetz and Courtney Yuen contributed to this report.

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